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I've been trying to get rid of warnings in some older code (must use MSVC 2005, currently working with a 32 bit build), but have been struggling to get rid of a size_t to unsigned int conversion warning. We have our own Array<T> implementation of a growing array that implements an

template<typename I> const T& at(const I i) const {return atImpl(i);}

method. When called as

size_t i = 10; myArray.at(i);

I get a conversion from 'size_t' to 'const unsigned int', possible loss of data warning. A working theory has been that I is understood to be unsigned int, which is causing compiler to cast/convert the size_t to unsigned int when passing i to at (which would have been inconvenient but acceptable). However, I haven't been able to reproduce this warning in neither a minimal working example (bottom of this post), nor in more complex minimal examples. Simply casting the parameter to unsigned int makes the warning disappear and would be enough for our needs (by contract, the number fits within an unsigned int)

  1. Is my understanding about I being unsigned int in such a call correct (spec says "A typedef-name is thus a synonym for another type. A typedef-name does not introduce a new type", typeid(size_t(1)).name() says unsigned int and size_t seems to be typedeffed). In other words, should or should not the minimal example give the warning? The build configuration is the same, as far as I can tell.
  2. As our code gives us warnings and the minimal example doesn't, there's something I must be overlooking. Despite all effort, I can't figure out what. Ideas?

Thanks

The minimal example:

    template<typename T>
    class A
    {
      int t;
    public:
      template<typename I> T& at(const I i) { return t;}  
    };

    int main()
    {  
      size_t i = 10;
      A<int> a; 
      a.at(i) = 5; // no warning, why?
      return 0;
    }
share|improve this question
    
Do you have /Wp64 enabled? –  Charles Bailey Mar 20 '12 at 12:15
    
Are you by any chance using the /Wp64 option? It would warn that size_t has a different size in 64-bit mode, but unsigned int does not. –  Bo Persson Mar 20 '12 at 12:16
3  
If you are working on making the code portable, you should consider using std::size_t on your MyVector type anyway, rather than thinking whether the warning makes sense. One day or another you will change architectures (64bit) and size_t might be a different size and you will have to comeback and revisit all the warnings... Unless, of course, the argument is not used to access a container but to store in some other form. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 20 '12 at 12:25
1  
If atImpl takes unsigned, then could the warning stem from atImpl(i) which does in fact do an std::size_t to unsigned conversion when passed an std::size_t argument? –  Luc Danton Mar 20 '12 at 12:29
2  
Okay, question: Why the heck do you have your own std::vector implementation? –  Xeo Mar 20 '12 at 12:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The at function is also templated. C++ will try to deduce the template type argument. Which is what is happening in your code since you are not specifying the type in the call such as a.at< size_t>(1);

This code will generate a warning because it has deduced the type as a unsigned int and then we try to pass an size_t

template <typename T>
class A
{
    int t;
    public:
        template<typename I> T& at(const I i)
        { return t;}
};

int main()
{
    unsigned int j = 5;
    size_t i = 10;
    A<int> a;

    a.at(j) = 4; // deduce template type as unsigned int
    a.at(i) = 5; // generate warning
    return 0;
}

EDIT: I actually tried this code in VS and it generates the warning.

Edit2: In the code I tried size_t and unsigned int are both also 4 bytes. So I did some digging. In older versions of VS size_t is defined as typedef __w64 unsigned int size_t The '__w64' is now deprecated but was used to flag types that would have a different size (eg 64 vs 32) when moving to a 64 bit platform. The __w64 causes the compiler to see size_t as a different type.

As an experiment I typedefed my own unsigned int myint and changed the line size_t i = 10 to myint i = 10.

using typedef __w64 unsigned int myint generates the warning where as 'typedef unsigned int myint` does not generate a warning.

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I think this is it. For further reference, it seems that since size_t amounts to unsigned int in my configuration, both at(size_t(1)) and at((unsigned int)2) would instantiate and reuse the same version of at (as both are synonyms under my current configuration). If a.at(j);a.at(i); is used, a unsigned int version of at is instantiated, and then, due to the equivalence, reused by the a.at(i); reference, which triggers the warning. If a.at(i);a.at(j); is used, a size_t version is inst. and reused by the a.at(j) reference, no problem/warn. Correct? Great find! –  Jan Benes Mar 20 '12 at 13:40
    
That is a good summation. You are also correct if the a.at(i) would have been called first, when a.at(j) is called the unsigned int is promoted to size_t (unsigned long) without loss of data. –  Charlie Mar 20 '12 at 13:50
    
Actually, to be clear, I'm talking about a 32 bit build, where sizeof(i) == sizeof(j), so there would not, afaik, be any promotion taking place. The rest still hold, as far as I can tell. –  Jan Benes Mar 20 '12 at 13:58
    
Would the explicit keyword be useful in this case? Would it even be valid? (I haven't used it much, so I'm not sure.) –  aldo Mar 20 '12 at 14:28
    
HazaB, I see. I think I would defer back to the comments above. Is it possible your build has redefined size_t? Perhaps to a signed value. –  Charlie Mar 20 '12 at 14:46

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