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I wrote program which realises this formula:

Pi = 1/n * summ( 4 / ( 1 + ((i-0.5) /n)^2)

Program code:

#include <iostream>
#include <math.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/time.h>
using namespace std;

const long double PI = double(M_PI);

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    typedef struct timeval tm;
    tm start, end;
    int  timer = 0;
    int n;

    if (argc == 2) n = atoi(argv[1]);
    else n = 8000;

    long double pi1 = 0;
    gettimeofday ( &start, NULL );

    for(int i = 1; i <= n; i++) {
        pi1 += 4 / ( 1 + (i-0.5) * (i-0.5) / (n*n) );
    }

    pi1/=n;
    gettimeofday ( &end, NULL );
    timer = ( end.tv_usec - start.tv_usec ); 
    long double delta = pi1 - PI;
    printf("pi = %.12Lf\n",pi1);
    printf("delta = %.12Lf\n", delta);

    cout << "time = " << timer << endl;
    return 0;
}

How to present it in an optimal way? when there will be less floating-point operations in this part:

for(int i = 1; i <= n; i++) {
            pi1 += 4 / ( 1 + (i-0.5) * (i-0.5) / (n*n) );
        }

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
what do you mean "less operations" - lines of code or instructions once built? –  Nim Mar 20 '12 at 12:52
3  
Sergey, does your spacebar not work? –  jrok Mar 20 '12 at 12:53
4  
why combine printf and cout –  triclosan Mar 20 '12 at 12:53
    
Nim, I mean instructions –  Sergey Mar 20 '12 at 12:55
2  
Do you want to calculate PI or is this question about optimization? Calculating pi (or other series functions) with IEEE floating point is an entire science by itself. –  hochl Mar 20 '12 at 13:07

4 Answers 4

one idea will be:

double nn = n*n;
for(double i = 0.5; i < n; i += 1) {
    pi1 += 4 / ( 1 + i * i / nn );
}

but you need to test if it is any difference with current code.

share|improve this answer

I suggest you read this excellent document:

Software Optimization Guide for AMD64 Processors

Which is also great when you do not have an AMD processor.

But if I were you, I would replace the whole calculation loop with just

pi1 = M_PI;

Which will probably be the fastest... If you are actually interested in a faster algorithm for Pi calculations, look at the Wikipedia article: Category:Pi algorithm

If you just want to microoptimize your code, read the above mentioned software optimization guide.

share|improve this answer

Examples of simple optimization:

  • compute double one_per_n = 1/n; outside the for loop reducing the cost of dividing by non each iteration
  • compute double j = (i-0.5) * one_per_n inside the loop
  • pi1 += 4 / (1 + j*j);

This should be faster and also avoid the integer overflow you have for greater values of n. For even more optimized code you will have to look at the generated code and use a profiler to make appropriate changes. The optimized code this way might behave differently on machines with a different CPU or cache.... Avoiding divisions is something that is always good to do to save computation time.

share|improve this answer
#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>
#include <chrono>

#ifndef M_PI //M_PI is non standard make you sure catch this case
    #define M_PI 3.14159265358979323846
#endif

typdef long double float_t;
const float_t PI = double(M_PI);

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    int n = argc == 2 ? atoi(argv[1]) : 8000;
    float_t pi1=0.0;
    //if you can using auto here is a no brainer
    std::chrono::time_point start   
          =std::chrono::system_clock::now();

    unsigned n2=n*n;
    for(unsigned i = 1; i <= n; i++) 
    {
        pi1 += 4.0 / ( 1.0 + (i-0.5) * (i-0.5) / n2 );
    }
    pi1/=n;
    std::chrono::duration<double> time
         =std::chrono::system_clock::now()-start;

    float_t delta = pi1 - PI;

    std::cout << "pi = " << std::setprecision(12) << pi1
              << "delta = " << std::setprecision(12) << delta
              << "\ntime = " << time.count() << std::endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Sergey: which part, I have just editted so look again. –  111111 Mar 20 '12 at 13:10
    
@Sergey: check again –  111111 Mar 20 '12 at 13:10
    
Oh...sorry) thank you very much! –  Sergey Mar 20 '12 at 13:11
    
@Also I am not a mathmaticain but the optimal way do this would be a way of represnting it as a sequence which can be computed in o(1) rather than as a loop but I aren't sure whether that is possible. –  111111 Mar 20 '12 at 13:12
    
I`m very tired today =) –  Sergey Mar 20 '12 at 13:12

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