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This is probably just me being stupid somehow or the other, but I am relatively new to C++, so forgive me the idiocy. I'm trying to teach myself how to use operators. I've defined a very basic operator as follows:

Matrix::Matrix operator+(Matrix a1, Matrix a2) {
    if(a1.rows != a2.rows || a1.cols != a2.cols) {
        std::cout << "ERROR: Attempting to add matrices of non-equal size." << std::endl;
        exit(6);
    }

    int i, j;

    Matrix c(a1.rows, a1.cols);

    for(i = 0; i < a1.rows; i++)
        for(j = 0; j < a1.cols; j++)
            c.val[i][j] = a1.val[i][j] + a2.val[i][j];

    return c;
}

The class Matrix represents a matrix, and has a constructor that takes two ints as input (the number of rows and columns in the matrix, respectively), and creates a 2D array of doubles of the appropriate size (named val). This function works as supposed to in that the value for c is correct, but it also appears to destruct a1 and a2. That is, if I write

Matrix c = a + b;

It gives the right result, but a and b are no longer usable, and I get a glibc error at the end of the code claiming I am trying to destruct a and b when they have already been destructed. Why is this?

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2  
This code shouldn’t even compile, it’s missing the return type. Please post the correct code, and also a minimal (but compiling!) version of the Matrix class, in particular showing the constructor, copy constructor and destructor! –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 20 '12 at 13:25
    
This code does compile... I copy-pasted the code. I'm not sure what you mean by missing the return type, it returns something in the class Matrix since it's defined as Matrix::Matrix operator+(...), right? –  wolfPack88 Mar 20 '12 at 13:30
1  
Are you following the rule of the three? My interpretation is that you are dynamically allocating memory, and (probably) releasing it in the destructor. If so, have you provided a copy constructor and assignment operator? If not your issue might be that the arguments are being copied but only the pointers are copied. Then the first copy to go out of scope will release the memory and you have an issue... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 20 '12 at 13:31
1  
@wolfPack88 Well, what is Matrix::Matrix? Is it actually a type? Normally the return type should be the same as the argument types here, i.e. plain Matrix (see my answer …). Matrix::Matrix doesn’t make sense. –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 20 '12 at 13:53
1  
FYI I edited my answer with a thorough explanation. @wolfPack88 –  Luchian Grigore Mar 20 '12 at 17:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Your signature is wrong:

Matrix operator+(Matrix a1, Matrix a2)

it should be

Matrix operator+(const Matrix& a1, const Matrix& a2)

The reason it appears to destroy a1 and a2 is because, well, it is, since those are temporary copies created in the method scope.

If the original values are destroyed, you're probably violating the rule of three. When a1 and a2 are destroyed, the destructor gets called, and you're probably deleting pointers in the destructor. But since the default copy constructor does only a shallow copy, the copied a2 and a1 will delete the original memory.

Edit: Since there are split opinions about this, I'll extend my answer:

Assume:

struct A
{
   int* x;
   A() { x = new int; *x = 1; }
   ~A() { delete x; }
};

//option 1:
A operator + (A a1, A a2)
{
   A a; return a; //whatever, we don't care about the return value
}

//option 2:
A operator + (const A& a1, const A& a2)
{
   A a; return a; //again, we don't really care about the return value
}

In this first example, the copy constructor is not implemented.

A copy constructor is generated by the compiler. This copy constructor copies x into the new instance. So if you have:

A a;
A b = a;
assert( a.x == b.x );

Important note that the pointers are the same.

Calling option 1 will create copies inside operator +, because the values are passed by value:

A a;
A b;
a + b; 
//will call:
A operator + (A a1, A a2)
// a1.x == a.x
// a2.x == n.x

When operator + exits, it will call delete x on objects a1 and a2, which will delete the memory that is also pointed to by a.x and b.x. That is why you get the memory corruption.

Calling option 2 however, since no new objects are created because you pass by reference, the memory will not be deleted upon function return.

However, this isn't the cleanest way to solve the issue. It solves this issue, but the underlying one is much more important, as Konrad Pointed out, and I have in my original answer (although haven't given it enough importance, I admit).

Now, the correct way of solving this is properly following the rule of three. That is, have an implementation for destructor, copy constructor and assignment operator:

struct A
{
   int* x;
   A() { x = new int; *x = 1; }
   A(const A& other)  //copy constructor
   {
      x = new int;  // this.x now points to a different memory location than other.x
      *x = other.(*x);  //copy the value though
   }
   A& operator = (const A& other) //assignment operator
   { 
      delete x; //clear the previous memory
      x = new int;     
      *x = other.(*x);  //same as before
   }
   ~A() { delete x; }
};

With this new code, let's re-run the problematic option 1 from before:

A a;
A b;
a + b; 
//will call:
A operator + (A a1, A a2)
// a1.x != a.x
// a2.x != n.x

Because the copies a1 and a2 now point to different memory locations, when they are destroyed, the original memory is intact and the original objects - a and b remain valid.

Phew! Hope this clears things up.

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–1, Both signatures are incorrect, but for a different reason. Passing the arguments by value is actually correct, albeit inefficient. –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 20 '12 at 13:29
    
Why is passing const reference wrong? –  crashmstr Mar 20 '12 at 13:31
    
@KonradRudolph correct in what sense? That it compiles? If you'd pass by reference, it would solve the issue, since the destructor wouldn't get called. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 20 '12 at 13:31
    
@KonradRudolph can you please tell me what's wrong? –  Luchian Grigore Mar 20 '12 at 13:33
1  
@KonradRudolph I agree and I pointed that out later in my answer. I don't think the answer deserves a downvote, if that's your only argument. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 20 '12 at 13:43

As Luchian Grigore pointed out, your signature is wrong and should be:

Matrix operator+(const Matrix& a1, const Matrix& a2)

But even this signature should not itself spoil a and b. But because you are copying arguments, I have another suspicion.

Have you defined your own copy constructor? I think you may be deleting the old variables when you are copying their values to the operator's arguments.

Please share your copy constructor (and preferably also operator= and the two-argument constructor that you use in this operator)

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I’m assuming that you are allocating dynamic memory inside the Matrix class using new and didn’t implement a custom copy constructor, thus violating the rule of three.

The cause of the error would then be that the local copy of the Matrix instances reuses the dynamic memory of the argument instances, and their destructors free it at the end of the method.

The solution is very simple: Don’t use pointers. Instead, you could use a nested std::vector to store the data.

Furthermore, the head of the operator is mangled. Depending on where you declare the function, it must either look like this, if you define the operator inside the class:

ReturnType operator +(Arg1)

Or, if you define it outside the class, it needs to look like this:

ReturnType operator +(Arg1, Arg2)

Yours is a wild mix of both. I’m assuming that your operator definition should look as follows:

Matrix operator +(Matrix a, Matrix b) { … }

If your code compiles then this is either an error in the compiler or you are using a very weird class structure indeed. Furthermore, as Luchian pointed out, it’s more efficient to pass the arguments as const& rather than by value. However, you should first make your code run correctly.

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I am indeed allocating memory dynamically inside the class (the 2D array val is dynamically allocated using new). However, I am not sure what is meant by the rule of three. As mentioned previously, I am rather new to C++ and OOP, so any insight into what the aforementioned rule of three is would be very helpful. –  wolfPack88 Mar 20 '12 at 13:28
    
@wolfPack88 Read what the link has to say about the rule of three. However, the real solution is to not depend on the rule of three by not using pointers. They are unnecessary here. –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 20 '12 at 13:28
    
@KonradRudolph: Saying "they are unnecessary" is improper. The fat that memory is dynamic, requires dynamic allocation hence pointers. Using vector you're not eliminating them, just wrapping them into something that's able by itself to manage them with both copy and move semantics. –  Emilio Garavaglia Mar 20 '12 at 15:47
    
@Emilio Details. The relevant point is that your code shouldn’t manage pointers or dynamic memory. This is a low-level details that belongs encapsulated. And since pointers are responsible for so much crap C++ code I feel increasingly strongly about this issue. Unnecessary pointers and/or dynamic memory management in code are absolutely inacceptable. –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 20 '12 at 15:50
    
@KonradRudolph: Agree. But we don't know how "detail" the OP is interested in. My point is that std::vector is not doing anything magic. In particular is not "avoiding the use of dynamic memory" by making it somehow static, as the phrase "pointers are not necessary" may improperly suggest. I just simply wanted to avoid a potential misunderstanding. But I was misunderstood :-( –  Emilio Garavaglia Mar 21 '12 at 8:09

Since the size of the matrix is given at runtime, I suppose that the Matrix class hold a pointer that is initialized with a dynamically allocated array that is deleted by the destructor.

In that case, the copy constructor and the assignment operator must also be definedin order to allocate the copies of what the a matrix holds.

Not doing that, the default copy and assignment will just reassign the pointers, letting you with two or more Matrix holding a same array. And when one is destroyed (thus deleting the array) the others remain dangling.

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