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I have a unit test like so:

    [Test]
    public void DataIn_NoOfRowsReached_CreatesSequentialData()
    {
        //Assert
        MyLogic logic = SetupLogic();
        logic.NoOfRows = 3;

        logic.DataIn(1, "1,4,7");
        logic.DataIn(2, "2,5,8");
        logic.DataIn(3, "3,6,9");

        CollectionAssert.AreEqual(new[] { "1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9" }, logic.ExpectedValues);
    }

Each DataIn call adds the passed in data to a separate list depending on ID (1st param). When the NoOfRows number equals the DataIn input Id it merges the data to be sequential. I then test to check this.

I now want to use test cases but I cannot see any easy way to do this without putting if statements and various optional parameters in the test method. I don't really want to duplicate the tests for various scenarios.

The NoOfRows maximum is 6.

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1  
Which unit test framework are you using? –  sloth Mar 20 '12 at 13:50
1  
So to paraphrase... you want to create a generic method that will take input parameters and do this specific test with a multitude of inputs? –  Hexxagonal Mar 20 '12 at 13:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I believe this is what you are looking for. Leverage the params keyword to allow passing in an arbitrary amount of strings.

[Test]
public void DataIn_NoOfRowsReached_CreatesSequentialData()
{
    MyGenericTest("1,4,7", "2,5,8", "3,6,9");
}

private void MyGenericTest(params string[] inputs)
{
    //Assert
    MyLogic logic = SetupLogic();
    logic.NoOfRows = inputs.Length;

    List<string> allNumbers = new List<string>();
    for(int i = 0; i < inputs.Length; i++)
    {
       logic.DataIn(i + 1, inputs[i]);
       allNumbers.AddRange(inputs[i].Split(',');
    }

    allNumbers.Sort();
    CollectionAssert.AreEqual(allNumbers.Distinct(), logic.ExpectedValues);
}

This just does string sorting... if you have numbers that are bigger than 9, you'll want to add your own compare function to the Sort() method.

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I assume casting all the strings as int then sorting them would work as well? –  Jon Mar 20 '12 at 20:08
    
Yeah, using int.Parse, int.TryParse, or whatever your favorite conversion method is would work fine. I kept it as strings because I assumed you probably wanted strings. –  Hexxagonal Mar 20 '12 at 20:15
1  
Yeah I did until you mentioned numbers greater than 9! Thanks –  Jon Mar 20 '12 at 20:45

If you are using NUnit and want to run multiple test cases with different input, you could make use of the Values attribute, http://nunit.com/index.php?p=values&r=2.6 .

Your unit test could then look like this:

[Test]
public void DataIn_NoOfRowsReached_CreatesSequentialData([Values(new[] { "1,4,7", "2,5,8", "3,6,9" }, ...)] string[] vals)
{
    //Assert
    MyLogic logic = SetupLogic();
    logic.NoOfRows = vals.Length;

    for (var i = 0; i < vals.Length; ++i)
      logic.DataIn(i + 1, vals[i]);

    CollectionAssert.AreEqual(new[] { "1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9" }, logic.ExpectedValues);
}
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1  
What is the difference between using Values and TestCases? –  Jon Mar 20 '12 at 16:54
    
Had not considered this, thanks for the idea. It seems that using Values in combination with the Combinatorial attribute gives you the possibility to test all possible combinations if you have two or more variables. On the other hand, using the TestCase attribute gives you additional degrees of freedom, for example by allowing you to set ExpectedException for a specific test case. If you only want to run sequential test cases, TestCase might also make the code more readable. I might even stretch so far as to say that I recommend using the TestCase attribute for the unit test above :-) –  Anders Gustafsson Mar 20 '12 at 17:25

If you want to write some "smart" tests, you probably can create the expected array with the numbers you enter as input and sort them, you can keep track of the numbers you enter as part of each row (use some numbers to create the string). Other than that I don't see too much improvement really.

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