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I love the null-coalescing operator because it makes it easy to assign a default value for nullable types.

 int y = x ?? -1;

That's great, except if I need to do something simple with x. For instance, if I want to check Session, then I usually end up having to write something more verbose.

I wish I could do this:

string y = Session["key"].ToString() ?? "none";

But you can't because the .ToString() gets called before the null check so it fails if Session["key"] is null. I end up doing this:

string y = Session["key"] == null ? "none" : Session["key"].ToString();

It works and is better, in my opinion, than the three-line alternative:

string y = "none";
if (Session["key"] != null)
    y = Session["key"].ToString();

Even though that works I am still curious if there is a better way. It seems no matter what I always have to reference Session["key"] twice; once for the check, and again for the assignment. Any ideas?

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19  
This is when I wish C# had a "safe navigation operator" (.?) like Groovy has. –  Cameron Mar 20 '12 at 16:11
2  
@Cameron: This is when I wish C# could treat nullable types (including reference types) as a monad, so you wouldn’t need a “safe navigation operator”. –  Jon Purdy Mar 21 '12 at 2:33
2  
The inventor of null references called it his "billion dollar mistake" and I tend to agree. See infoq.com/presentations/… –  Jamie Ide Mar 21 '12 at 13:57
    
His actual mistake is the unsafe (not language-enforced) mixing of nullable and non-nullabel types. –  MSalters Mar 22 '12 at 12:50

9 Answers 9

up vote 176 down vote accepted

What about

string y = (Session["key"] ?? "none").ToString();
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72  
The force is strong with this one. –  Alex Ford Mar 20 '12 at 14:13
2  
@Matthew: No because Session values are of type Object –  BlackBear Mar 20 '12 at 14:21
1  
@BlackBear but the value returned is most probably a string, so the cast is valid –  Firo Mar 20 '12 at 14:29
10  
I dislike this because if you have any other type of object stuffed in the session than what you expect you may be hiding some subtle bugs in your program. I'd rather use a safe cast because I think it's likely to surface errors faster. It also avoids calling ToString() on a string object. –  tvanfosson Mar 20 '12 at 19:17
2  
Compact, but redundant. –  Kevin Wang Mar 27 '12 at 9:45

If you're frequently doing this specifically with ToString() then you could write an extension method:

public static string NullPreservingToString(this object input)
{
    return input == null ? null : input.ToString();
}

...

string y = Session["key"].NullPreservingToString() ?? "none";

Or a method taking a default, of course:

public static string ToStringOrDefault(this object input, string defaultValue)
{
    return input == null ? defaultValue : input.ToString();
}

...

string y = Session["key"].ToStringOrDefault("none");
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14  
.ToStringOrDefault() is simple and elegent. A nice solution. –  Alex Ford Mar 20 '12 at 14:16
7  
I cannot agree with this at all. Extension methods on object are a curse and junk up a code base, and extension methods that operate without error on null this values are pure evil. –  Nick Larsen Mar 20 '12 at 19:01
9  
@NickLarsen: Everything in moderation, I say. Extension methods which work with null can be very useful, IMO - so long as they're clear about what they do. –  Jon Skeet Mar 20 '12 at 19:03
3  
@one.beat.consumer: Yup. If it had just been the formatting (or any typos), that would have been one thing, but changing an author's choice of method name is beyond what's normally appropriate editing, IMO. –  Jon Skeet Mar 21 '12 at 17:27
4  
@one.beat.consumer: When correcting grammar and typos, that's fine - but changing a name which someone (anyone, not just me) has clearly deliberately chosen feels different to me. At that point, I'd suggest it in a comment instead. –  Jon Skeet Mar 22 '12 at 15:11

You could also use as, which yields null if the conversion fails:

Session["key"] as string ?? "none"

This would return "none" even if someone stuffed an int in Session["key"].

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1  
This only works when you wouldn't need ToString() in the first place. –  Abel Mar 21 '12 at 21:04
1  
I’m surprised nobody has downvoted this answer yet. This is semantically completely different from what the OP wants to do. –  Timwi Mar 22 '12 at 15:27
    
@Timwi: The OP uses ToString() to convert an object containing a string to a string. You can do the same with obj as string or (string)obj. It's a fairly common situation in ASP.NET. –  Andomar Mar 22 '12 at 16:13
4  
@Andomar: No, the OP is calling ToString() on an object (namely, Session["key"]) whose type he didn’t mention. It could be any kind of object, not necessarily a string. –  Timwi Mar 22 '12 at 16:50

If it will always be a string, you can cast:

string y = (string)Session["key"] ?? "none";

This has the advantage of complaining instead of hiding the mistake if someone stuffs an int or something in Session["key"]. ;)

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All of the suggested solutions are good, and answer the question; so this is just to extend on it slightly. Currently the majority of answers only deal with null validation and string types. You could extend the StateBag object to include a generic GetValueOrDefault method, similar to the answer posted by Jon Skeet.

A simple generic extension method that accepts a string as a key, and then type checks the session object. If the object is null or not the same type, the default is returned, otherwise the session value is returned strongly typed.

Something like this

/// <summary>
/// Gets a value from the current session, if the type is correct and present
/// </summary>
/// <param name="key">The session key</param>
/// <param name="defaultValue">The default value</param>
/// <returns>Returns a strongly typed session object, or default value</returns>
public static T GetValueOrDefault<T>(this HttpSessionState source, string key, T defaultValue)
{
    // check if the session object exists, and is of the correct type
    object value = source[key]
    if (value == null || !(value is T))
    {
        return defaultValue;
    }

    // return the session object
    return (T)value;
}
share|improve this answer
4  
very cool idea. –  one.beat.consumer Mar 20 '12 at 18:40
1  
Can you include a usage sample for this extension method? Doesn't StateBag deal with view state and not session? I'm using ASP.NET MVC 3 so I don't really have simple access to view state. I think you want to extend HttpSessionState. –  Alex Ford Mar 20 '12 at 19:32
    
this answer requires retrieving the value 3x and 2 casts if it succeeds. (i know it's a dictionary, but beginners may use similar practices on expensive methods.) –  jberger Mar 20 '12 at 20:37
3  
T value = source[key] as T; return value ?? defaultValue; –  jberger Mar 20 '12 at 20:38
1  
@jberger Casting to value using "as" is inaccessible as there isn't a class constraint on the generic type as potentially you may want to return a value such as bool. @AlexFord My apologies, you would want to extend the HttpSessionState for the session. :) –  Richard Mar 21 '12 at 9:59

We use a method called NullOr.

Usage

// Call ToString() if it’s not null, otherwise return null
var str = myObj.NullOr(obj => obj.ToString());

// Supply default value for when it’s null
var str = myObj.NullOr(obj => obj.ToString()) ?? "none";

// Works with nullable return values, too —
// this is properly typed as “int?” (nullable int)
// even if “Count” is just int
var count = myCollection.NullOr(coll => coll.Count);

// Works with nullable input types, too
int? unsure = 47;
var sure = unsure.NullOr(i => i.ToString());

Source

/// <summary>Provides a function delegate that accepts only value types as return types.</summary>
/// <remarks>This type was introduced to make <see cref="ObjectExtensions.NullOr{TInput,TResult}(TInput,FuncStruct{TInput,TResult})"/>
/// work without clashing with <see cref="ObjectExtensions.NullOr{TInput,TResult}(TInput,FuncClass{TInput,TResult})"/>.</remarks>
public delegate TResult FuncStruct<in TInput, TResult>(TInput input) where TResult : struct;

/// <summary>Provides a function delegate that accepts only reference types as return types.</summary>
/// <remarks>This type was introduced to make <see cref="ObjectExtensions.NullOr{TInput,TResult}(TInput,FuncClass{TInput,TResult})"/>
/// work without clashing with <see cref="ObjectExtensions.NullOr{TInput,TResult}(TInput,FuncStruct{TInput,TResult})"/>.</remarks>
public delegate TResult FuncClass<in TInput, TResult>(TInput input) where TResult : class;

/// <summary>Provides extension methods that apply to all types.</summary>
public static class ObjectExtensions
{
    /// <summary>Returns null if the input is null, otherwise the result of the specified lambda when applied to the input.</summary>
    /// <typeparam name="TInput">Type of the input value.</typeparam>
    /// <typeparam name="TResult">Type of the result from the lambda.</typeparam>
    /// <param name="input">Input value to check for null.</param>
    /// <param name="lambda">Function to apply the input value to if it is not null.</param>
    public static TResult NullOr<TInput, TResult>(this TInput input, FuncClass<TInput, TResult> lambda) where TResult : class
    {
        return input == null ? null : lambda(input);
    }

    /// <summary>Returns null if the input is null, otherwise the result of the specified lambda when applied to the input.</summary>
    /// <typeparam name="TInput">Type of the input value.</typeparam>
    /// <typeparam name="TResult">Type of the result from the lambda.</typeparam>
    /// <param name="input">Input value to check for null.</param>
    /// <param name="lambda">Function to apply the input value to if it is not null.</param>
    public static TResult? NullOr<TInput, TResult>(this TInput input, Func<TInput, TResult?> lambda) where TResult : struct
    {
        return input == null ? null : lambda(input);
    }

    /// <summary>Returns null if the input is null, otherwise the result of the specified lambda when applied to the input.</summary>
    /// <typeparam name="TInput">Type of the input value.</typeparam>
    /// <typeparam name="TResult">Type of the result from the lambda.</typeparam>
    /// <param name="input">Input value to check for null.</param>
    /// <param name="lambda">Function to apply the input value to if it is not null.</param>
    public static TResult? NullOr<TInput, TResult>(this TInput input, FuncStruct<TInput, TResult> lambda) where TResult : struct
    {
        return input == null ? null : lambda(input).Nullable();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this is the more generic answer to the problem intended - you beat me to it - and a candidate for safe navigation (if you don't mind the lambda-s for simple things) - but it's still a bit cumbersome to write, well :). Personally I'd always pick the ? : instead (if not expensive, if it is then rearrange anyway)... –  NSGaga Mar 26 '12 at 12:18
    
...And the 'Naming' is the real problem with this one - nothing really seems to depict right (or 'adds' too much), or is long - NullOr is good but too much emphasis on 'null' IMO (plus you have ?? still) - 'Property', or 'Safe' is what I used. value.Dot(o=>o.property) ?? @default maybe? –  NSGaga Mar 26 '12 at 12:26
    
@NSGaga: We went back and forth on the name for quite some time. We did consider Dot but found it too undescriptive. We settled for NullOr as a good tradeoff between self-explanation and brevity. If you really didn’t care about the naming at all, you could always call it _. If you find the lambdas too cumbersome to write, you can use a snippet for this, but personally I find it quite easy enough. As for ? :, you can’t use that with more complex expressions, you’d have to move them to a new local; NullOr allows you to avoid that. –  Timwi Mar 26 '12 at 14:23

My preference, for a one off, would be to use a safe cast to string in case the object stored with the key isn't one. Using ToString() may not have the results you want.

var y = Session["key"] as string ?? "none";

As @Jon Skeet says, if you find yourself doing this a lot an extension method or, better, yet maybe an extension method in conjunction with a strongly typed SessionWrapper class. Even without the extension method, the strongly typed wrapper might be a good idea.

public class SessionWrapper
{
    private HttpSessionBase Session { get; set; }

    public SessionWrapper( HttpSessionBase session )
    {
        Session = session;
    }

    public SessionWrapper() : this( HttpContext.Current.Session ) { }

    public string Key
    {
         get { return Session["key"] as string ?? "none";
    }

    public int MaxAllowed
    {
         get { return Session["maxAllowed"] as int? ?? 10 }
    }
}

Used as

 var session = new SessionWrapper(Session);

 string key = session.Key;
 int maxAllowed = session.maxAllowed;
share|improve this answer

create an auxiliary function

public static String GetValue( string key, string default )
{
    if ( Session[ key ] == null ) { return default; }
    return Session[ key ].toString();
}


string y = GetValue( 'key', 'none' );
share|improve this answer

Skeet's answer is the best - in particularly I think his ToStringOrNull() is quite elegant and suits your need best. I wanted to add one more option to the list of extension methods:

Return original object or default string value for null:

// Method:
public static object OrNullAsString(this object input, string defaultValue)
{
    if (defaultValue == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("defaultValue");
    return input == null ? defaultValue : input;
}

// Example:
var y = Session["key"].OrNullAsString("defaultValue");

Use var for the returned value as it will come back as the original input's type, only as the default string when null

share|improve this answer
    
Why throw an exception on null defaultValue if it is not needed (that is input != null)? –  Attila Mar 21 '12 at 17:00
    
An input != null eval will return the object as itself. input == null returns a the string provided as a param. therefore it is possible a person could call .OnNullAsString(null) - but the purpose (albeit rarely useful extension method) was to ensure you either get the object back or default string... never null –  one.beat.consumer Mar 21 '12 at 17:17
    
The input!=null scenario will only return the input if defaultValue!=null also holds; otherwise it will throw an ArgumentNullException. –  Attila Mar 21 '12 at 17:59

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