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EDIT: this was originally thought to be a fragmentation problem, here is a more precise statement of the problem.

I have this perfectly working code:

while(true)
{
    Job job = provider.NextJob();
    if (job.get() == NULL)
    {
        Result jobResult = job.Run();
        provider.ProcessJobResult(jobResult);       
    }
    else
    break;
}

I reimplement it: (originally there were several threads, but a single thread still manifests the problem)

JobProvider provider;
Concurrency::task_group taskGroup;

std::function<void ()> processingJob = [&provider, &taskGroup, &processingJob]
{
    Job job = provider.NextJob();
    if (job.get() == NULL)
    {
        Result jobResult = job.Run();
        provider.ProcessJobResult(jobResult);
        taskGroup.run(jobCode);
    }
};

taskGroup.run(jobCode);
taskGroup.wait();

This code crashes due to no memory after a while. To analyse memory space I used:

  1. function _CrtDumpMemoryLeaks() in crtdbg.h - which shows there are no leaks if the amount of jobs is small enough to let the application complete and exit.
  2. this profiler: http://hashpling.org/asm/ This is what the profiler shows: Profiler output

Red means committed, Yellow reserved and Green, which was entirely consumed, means free. Threads that taskGroup creates don't clean reserved memory. Can anyone say why?

share|improve this question
1  
Do you release the memory after each image? This sounds more like a memory leak than fragmentation at first glance. –  Mark B Mar 20 '12 at 15:06
    
Yes I do, images are large enough to be seen as red stripes and this picture was taken after processing over 2GB of images. It looks like a lot of small objects are living among the reserved yellow area. The red mass in the end shifted from left to right with time. –  Leo Mar 20 '12 at 15:10
    
It sounds like small chunks of memory may be getting leaked. If everything is cleaned up after each image fragmentation shouldn't be a problem. If you have access to Purify or the ability to compile on Linux and use valgrind that's probably your best bet here. –  Mark B Mar 20 '12 at 15:21
    
Not everything is cleaned up. Processing results (small objects) are accumulated. I'm am afraid I don't have neither options. –  Leo Mar 20 '12 at 15:24
    
Use the debugger to view the reserved regions, see what they belong to. Maybe they are reserved for stacks of threads that you leaked? Or reserved for heap blocks that you leaked? –  Raymond Chen Mar 20 '12 at 17:58

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