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How do I make the following class threadsafe?

public class Helper
{
    private static Map<String,String> map = null;

    public static init()
    {
        map = new HashMap<String,String>();
        // some loading stuff
    }

    public static getMap()
    {
       if(map==null) init();
       return new HashMap<String,String>(map);
    }
}

My ideas so far:

  1. Make getMap() synchronized. Problem: Makes the program slower than necessary, because syncronization is only needed at the start of the program and then never again.

  2. Use a lock. The problem is that the method "isLocked" which I use here doesn't exist. So what would be the best solution?

    public class Helper
    {
     private static Map<String,String> map = null;
     private static Lock lock = new ReentrantLock();
    
     public static init()
      {
         lock.lock();
         map = new HashMap<String,String>();
         // some loading stuff
         lock.unlock();
    }
    
    public static getMap()
    {
       synchronized {if(map==null) init();}
       while(lock.isLocked()) {Thread.wait(1);]
       return new HashMap<String,String>(map);
    }
    

    }

P.S.: Sorry for the second source code display problem. There seems to be a bug with using code after an enumeration.

P.P.S.: I know HashMap isn't thread safe. But that only means that I cannot write in parallel, reading shouldn't be a problem, should it?

P.P.P.S.: My final version (just the inner class), following John Vint:

protected static class LazyLoaded
{
    static final Map<String,String> map;
    static
    {
        Map<String,String> mapInit = new HashMap<>();
                    // ...loading...
        map = Collections.unmodifiableMap(mapInit); 
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
You must first define what thread-safe will mean for this class. Will items be added to the map throughout the life of the program? If so, should clients that call getMap see those changes appear in their copies over time? If so, consider using Collections.unmodifiableMap instead of making a copy. –  David Harkness Mar 20 '12 at 15:07
    
Sorry, I forgot to make init and getMap static, fixed now. –  Konrad Höffner Mar 20 '12 at 15:10
    
@David Harkness: With thread-safe I mean that the program will not crash and that getMap() does not return until the map is fully loaded. The map is only loaded once and not changed thereafter. Using Collections.unmodifiableMap is a great idea! –  Konrad Höffner Mar 20 '12 at 15:12
    
Nice job incorporating an unmodifiableMap + final! –  John Vint Mar 20 '12 at 15:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would delegate to a child class

public class Helper
{
    public static Map<String,String> getMap()
    {
         return HelperDelegate.map;
    }

    private static class HelperDelegate { 
           private static Map<String,String> map = new HashMap<String,String>();
           static{
                 //load some stuff
           } 

    }
}

Because class loading is thread-safe and occurs only once this will allow you to lazily initialize your Map.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a really elegant idea, thank you! –  Konrad Höffner Mar 20 '12 at 15:14
    
You could do it in the outer Helper class as well. –  Guillaume Polet Mar 20 '12 at 15:18
    
@GuillaumePolet If he wants it to be lazy he wouldn't be able to. –  John Vint Mar 20 '12 at 15:20

Simply synchronizing access to the map reference doesn't solve the problem. After the map is created, you need to synchronize operations which access and possibly modify the map's contents. An exception would be if you knew that the map is filled one time during initialization and afterwards only read operations are performed. In that case you may be fine without explicit synchronization, because your control flow takes care of that (knowing that your program's logic only allows reads after the map was initialized).

Otherwise, I would suggest you use one of the ConcurrentMap implementations, for example ConcurrentHashMap since they are relatively cheap if there is no lock contention and still provide the necessary thread safety if you do perform reads and writes during the map's lifetime.

As for the initialization, since it's a static field (so one instance only) and the cost of creating an empty map one time isn't high, I'd suggest you simply declare your map like so:

private static final Map<String,String> map = new ConcurrentHashMap<String,String>();

This way you don't need the conditional code in other methods, there are no reference visibility issues and the code gets simpler.

share|improve this answer
    
That map is indeed only filled once. –  Konrad Höffner Mar 20 '12 at 15:17

Synchronze init and put another check for null in there

public class Helper
{
    private static Map<String,String> map = null;

    public synchronized init()
    {
        if(map != null)
            return;
        map = new HashMap<String,String>();
        // some loading stuff
    }

    public getMap()
    {
       if(map==null) init();
       return new HashMap<String,String>(map);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, this is incorrect. If you instantiate Helper twice, in two different threads, there could be several instantiation of the HashMap –  Guillaume Polet Mar 20 '12 at 15:05
    
This does not work unfortunately because my second thread invokes the copy constructor before the first one is finished with the loading. –  Konrad Höffner Mar 20 '12 at 15:07

First, subsequent access to the map also needs to be synchronized, unless new HashMap() is replaced with new java.util.ConcurrentHashMap(). Then, if after initialization the variable map is never set to null again (or to any other value), then it can be declared volatile, method getMap() remain unsynchronized, ant method init() made synchronized. The method init() should one more time check if map is null.

BTW in your original code, 2 HashMaps are generated. getMap() should return variable map rather than new HashMap().

share|improve this answer

Double null-check in your init method:

public init() {
    if (map==null) {
        synchronized(Helper.class) {
            if (map==null)
                 map = new HashMap();
        }
    }
}

Btw:

  1. HashMap is not Thread-safe.
  2. put a synchronized on the instance method is not thread-safe because you access a static variable, ie, it is a class variable, not an instance variable
share|improve this answer
1  
Doesn't this still have the problem that my second thread can access the map after it is constructed but before it is filled? As far as I understand it, "synchronized" doesn't stop all code traversing the helper class, but only other synchronized blocks, right? –  Konrad Höffner Mar 20 '12 at 15:19
    
Not if you put the filling of your map inside the synchronized block. –  Guillaume Polet Mar 20 '12 at 15:34
    
it all depends on what you synchronize. If 2 threads synchronize on the same object (and a class is also a valid object), they cannot enter the block concurrently. This is why there is a double non-null check –  Guillaume Polet Mar 20 '12 at 15:39

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