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I have the following dummy code:

dt<-data.frame(country=letters[1:20],val=rnorm(20),siz=rnorm(20))
qplot(x=country,y=val,data=dt,geom="point",size=siz)

Now I want to increase the relative size of the points, since the resulting smallest point is too small. Is this possible to do by changing one parameter, like cex in base plots?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You want scale_size() and it's argument range (or to according to the ggplot website):

qplot(x=country,y=val,data=dt,geom="point", size=siz) + 
    scale_size(range = c(2, 10))

Fiddle with the range to get suitable minimum/maximum sizes.

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For the version of ggplot2 I am using (0.8.9) the argument is to, instead of range. And there it is in plain sight in the help page. How did I miss it, I do not understand. –  mpiktas Mar 20 '12 at 20:19
    
And you mentioned to in your post too. My head is not working properly today. –  mpiktas Mar 20 '12 at 20:20
    
Yeah, I'm not sure my workstation is up-to-date ggplot2-wise. –  Gavin Simpson Mar 20 '12 at 20:22
    
(+1): Great answer. Using scale_size_continuous(range = range(dt$siz)) would be more appropriate. –  MYaseen208 Dec 25 '14 at 9:15

Yes. Change the scale's range:

p <- qplot(x=country,y=val,data=dt,geom="point",size=siz)
p + scale_size_continuous(range = c(3,8))

enter image description here

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thanks for your answer. I upvoted both, but I could accept only one. –  mpiktas Mar 20 '12 at 20:19
    
May I ask how to remove that legend on the right side? –  Ida Apr 10 '14 at 9:05
    
(+1): Great answer. Using scale_size_continuous(range = range(dt$siz)) would be more appropriate. –  MYaseen208 Dec 25 '14 at 9:15

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