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I often find myself with a file that has one number per line. I end up importing it in excel to view things like median, standard deviation and so forth.

Is there a command line utility in linux to do the same? I usually need to find the average, median, min, max and std deviation.

Thanks!

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1  
This is probably relevant: stackoverflow.com/questions/214363/…. –  Oli Charlesworth Mar 20 '12 at 15:34
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9 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

This is a breeze with R. For a file that looks like this:

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Use this:

R -q -e "x <- read.csv('nums.txt', header = F); summary(x); sd(x[ , 1])"

To get this:

       V1       
 Min.   : 1.00  
 1st Qu.: 3.25  
 Median : 5.50  
 Mean   : 5.50  
 3rd Qu.: 7.75  
 Max.   :10.00  
[1] 3.02765

Edit to add a couple of clarifying comments (because I came back to this and didn't remember some of the rationale):

  • The -q flag squelches R's startup licensing and help output
  • The -e flag tells R you'll be passing an expression from the terminal
  • x is a data.frame - a table, basically. It's a structure that accommodates multiple vectors/columns of data, which is a little peculiar if you're just reading in a single vector. This has an impact on which functions you can use.
  • Some functions, like summary(), naturally accommodate data.frames. If x had multiple fields, summary() would provide the above descriptive stats for each.
  • But sd() can only take one vector at a time, which is why I index x for that command (x[ , 1] returns the first column of x). You could use apply(x, MARGIN = 2, FUN = sd) to get the SDs for all columns.
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Thanks. I have started using R since and I think it is a great tool to understand data –  MK. May 20 '12 at 9:19
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For the average, median & standard deviation you can use awk. For instance the following will print the average :

awk '{a+=$1} END{print a/NR}' myfile

(NR is an awk variable for the number of records, $1 means the first (space-separated) argument of the line ($0 would be the whole line, which would also work here but in principle would be less secure, although for the computation it would probably just take the first argument anyway) and END means that the following commands will be executed after having processed the whole file (one could also have initialized a to 0 in a BEGIN{a=0} statement)).

For the min/max, you can pipe sort & head/tail :

sort -n myfile | head -n1
sort -n myfile | tail -n1
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#!/usr/bin/perl
#
# stdev - figure N, min, max, median, mode, mean, & std deviation
#
# pull out all the real numbers in the input
# stream and run standard calculations on them.
# they may be intermixed with other test, need
# not be on the same or different lines, and 
# can be in scientific notion (avagadro=6.02e23).
# they also admit a leading + or -.
#
# Tom Christiansen
# tchrist@perl.com

use strict;
use warnings;

use List::Util qw< min max >;

#
my $number_rx = qr{

  # leading sign, positive or negative
    (?: [+-] ? )

  # mantissa
    (?= [0123456789.] )
    (?: 
        # "N" or "N." or "N.N"
        (?:
            (?: [0123456789] +     )
            (?:
                (?: [.] )
                (?: [0123456789] * )
            ) ?
      |
        # ".N", no leading digits
            (?:
                (?: [.] )
                (?: [0123456789] + )
            ) 
        )
    )

  # abscissa
    (?:
        (?: [Ee] )
        (?:
            (?: [+-] ? )
            (?: [0123456789] + )
        )
        |
    )
}x;

my $n = 0;
my $sum = 0;
my @values = ();

my %seen = ();

while (<>) {
    while (/($number_rx)/g) {
        $n++;
        my $num = 0 + $1;  # 0+ is so numbers in alternate form count as same
        $sum += $num;
        push @values, $num;
        $seen{$num}++;
    } 
} 

die "no values" if $n == 0;

my $mean = $sum / $n;

my $sqsum = 0;
for (@values) {
    $sqsum += ( $_ ** 2 );
} 
$sqsum /= $n;
$sqsum -= ( $mean ** 2 );
my $stdev = sqrt($sqsum);

my $max_seen_count = max values %seen;
my @modes = grep { $seen{$_} == $max_seen_count } keys %seen;

my $mode = @modes == 1 
            ? $modes[0] 
            : "(" . join(", ", @modes) . ")";
$mode .= ' @ ' . $max_seen_count;

my $median;
my $mid = int @values/2;
if (@values % 2) {
    $median = $values[ $mid ];
} else {
    $median = ($values[$mid-1] + $values[$mid])/2;
} 

my $min = min @values;
my $max = max @values;

printf "n is %d, min is %g, max is %d\n", $n, $min, $max;
printf "mode is %s, median is %g, mean is %g, stdev is %g\n", 
    $mode, $median, $mean, $stdev;
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Yep, it's called perl
and here is concise one-liner:

perl -e 'use List::Util qw(max min sum); @a=();while(<>){$sqsum+=$_*$_; push(@a,$_)}; $n=@a;$s=sum(@a);$a=$s/@a;$m=max(@a);$mm=min(@a);$std=sqrt($sqsum/$n-($s/$n)*($s/$n));$mid=int @a/2;@srtd=sort @a;if(@a%2){$med=$srtd[$mid];}else{$med=($srtd[$mid-1]+$srtd[$mid])/2;};print "records:$n\nsum:$s\navg:$a\nstd:$std\nmed:$med\max:$m\min:$mm";'

Example

$ cat tt
1
3
4
5
6.5
7.
2
3
4

And the command

cat tt | perl -e 'use List::Util qw(max min sum); @a=();while(<>){$sqsum+=$_*$_; push(@a,$_)}; $n=@a;$s=sum(@a);$a=$s/@a;$m=max(@a);$mm=min(@a);$std=sqrt($sqsum/$n-($s/$n)*($s/$n));$mid=int @a/2;@srtd=sort @a;if(@a%2){$med=$srtd[$mid];}else{$med=($srtd[$mid-1]+$srtd[$mid])/2;};print "records:$n\nsum:$s\navg:$a\nstd:$std\nmed:$med\max:$m\min:$mm";'
records:9
sum:35.5
avg:3.94444444444444
std:1.86256162380447
med:4
max:7.
min:1
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4  
I'm sure that works, but doing it all one line makes my eyes bleed. Why not create a script, rather than that atrocity? –  Oli Charlesworth Mar 20 '12 at 18:15
    
I'm from functional languages world (not M$, nor java), all people there speaks like that :) no one's hurt (discuss.joelonsoftware.com/default.asp?joel.3.263336.105) –  bua Mar 20 '12 at 19:19
5  
I'm pretty sure that "functional languages" != "write everything on one line as tersely as possible". –  Oli Charlesworth Mar 20 '12 at 21:48
    
Are you open minded enough to make it == ?? sudoku solver in mentioned k language: p:+{(=x)x}'p,,3/:_(p:,/'+:\9#'!9)%3;f:{$[&/x;,x;,/f'@[x;i;:;]'&27=x[,/p i:x?0]?!10]} –  bua Mar 20 '12 at 23:00
3  
Just because you can do something one line doesn't mean you should. –  Mike Monkiewicz Feb 22 '13 at 21:50
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Using "st" (https://github.com/nferraz/st)

$ st numbers.txt
N    min   max   sum   mean  stddev
10   1     10    55    5.5   3.02765

Or:

$ st numbers.txt --transpose
N      10
min    1
max    10
sum    55
mean   5.5
stddev 3.02765

(DISCLAIMER: I wrote this tool :))

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Just in case, there's datastat, a simple program for Linux computing simple statistics from the command-line. For example,

cat file.dat | datastat

will output the average value across all rows for each column of file.dat. If you need to know the standard deviation, min, max, you can add the --dev, --min and --max options, respectively.

datastat has the possibility to aggregate rows based on the value of one or more "key" columns. For example,

cat file.dat | datastat -k 1

will produce, for each different value found on the first column (the "key"), the average of all other column values as aggregated among all rows with the same value on the key. You can use more columns as key fields (e.g., -k 1-3, -k 2,4 etc...).

It's written in C++, runs fast and with small memory occupation, and can be piped nicely with other tools such as cut, grep, sed, sort, awk etc.

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There is also simple-r, which can do almost everything that R can, but with less keystrokes:

https://code.google.com/p/simple-r/

To calculate basic descriptive statistics, one would have to type one of:

r summary file.txt
r summary - < file.txt
cat file.txt | r summary -

For each of average, median, min, max and std deviation, the code would be:

seq 1 100 | r mean - 
seq 1 100 | r median -
seq 1 100 | r min -
seq 1 100 | r max -
seq 1 100 | r sd -

Doesn't get any simple-R!

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Mean:

awk '{mean += $1} END {print "mean = " mean/NR;}' filename

Median:

gawk -v max=128 '

    function median(c,v,  j) { 
       asort(v,j); 
       if (c % 2) return j[(c+1)/2]; 
       else return (j[c/2+1]+j[c/2])/2.0; 
    } 

    { 
       count++;
       values[count]=$1;  
       if (count >= max) { 
         print  median(count,values); count=0; 
       } 
    } 

    END { 
       print  "median = " median(count,values); 
    }' filename

Mode:

awk '{c[$1]++;} END {for (i in count) {if (c[i]>max) {max=i;}} print "mode = " max;}' filename

This mode calculation requires an even number of samples, but you see how it works...

Standard Deviation:

awk '{sum+=$1; sumsq+=$1*$1;} END {print "stdev = " sqrt(sumsq/NR - (sum/NR)**2);}' filename
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This one is great!!! –  James.Xu Nov 1 '13 at 5:37
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data_hacks is a Python command-line utility for basic statistics.

The first example from that page produces the desired results:

$ cat /tmp/data | histogram.py
# NumSamples = 29; Max = 10.00; Min = 1.00
# Mean = 4.379310; Variance = 5.131986; SD = 2.265389
# each * represents a count of 1
    1.0000 -     1.9000 [     1]: *
    1.9000 -     2.8000 [     5]: *****
    2.8000 -     3.7000 [     8]: ********
    3.7000 -     4.6000 [     3]: ***
    4.6000 -     5.5000 [     4]: ****
    5.5000 -     6.4000 [     2]: **
    6.4000 -     7.3000 [     3]: ***
    7.3000 -     8.2000 [     1]: *
    8.2000 -     9.1000 [     1]: *
    9.1000 -    10.0000 [     1]: *
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