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I'm pretty new to MYSQL. I'm trying to write a query which will search across multiple tables, but it appears to only evaluate the first condition of the query. The query I have developed is :

SELECT DISTINCT user.user_id, user_netid, user_firstname, user_lastname, 
    user_dmid, user_insnum, instype_id, user_birthday, user_insapproved 
FROM user, signup, event 
WHERE  (user.instype_id = 3 OR user.instype_id = 4) 
    AND signup.signup_attended =1 AND signup.signup_timestamp >= 1325376000 
    AND (event.activity_id=37 OR event.activity_id=40 OR event.activity_id=5);

I know it's pretty long, but like I said, I'm new to this and it was the best I could come up with. In any case, It appears to only evaluate user.instype_id because it gives me records in which signup.signup_attended !=1 or any of the other conditions which appear after user.instype_id. Can someone please show me what I'm doing wrong?

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2  
You should rewrite the query into a proper join-type syntax. Right now you're selecting from 3 tables, but not specifying ANY relationships between the tables, so you're ending with a cartesian join, which'll give you lots of bad results. – Marc B Mar 20 '12 at 15:36
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow! I always like to remind new users that the means of showing appreciation is through upvotes (once you get 20 reputation points) and accepting answers (checkmark next to answer). If you have any questions, please refer to the FAQ, especially the How to Ask – Justin Pihony Mar 20 '12 at 16:19
up vote 0 down vote accepted

My guess is that this is happening due to your cross join (list of tables with commas...but no joining statements). Basically, you may filter out users with an inst type, but you will still show users with a signup_attended because the user table and the signup table are not linked so it just starts mashing the tables together. Maybe wikipedia can explain a cross join better than I can :)

You need to rewrite your code using JOIN

Here is an example of what it would look like afterwards (with guesses on the join columns)

SELECT DISTINCT user.user_id, user_netid, user_firstname, user_lastname, 
    user_dmid, user_insnum, instype_id, user_birthday, user_insapproved 
FROM user
    JOIN signup
        ON signup.user_id = user.id
    JOIN event 
        ON event.signup_id = signup.id
WHERE  (user.instype_id = 3 OR user.instype_id = 4) 
    AND signup.signup_attended =1 AND signup.signup_timestamp >= 1325376000 
    AND (event.activity_id=37 OR event.activity_id=40 OR event.activity_id=5);

Perform a google on SQL JOIN and you should get a good bit of info explaining this. Here is one tutorial

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Okay, that makes a lot more sense. Thanks. I've re-written my query using that format. Now, however, only one record is being found, and I know there are definitely more than one record that meet these conditions. I tried getting rid of the "DISTINCT," but got the same result. – thuey Mar 20 '12 at 16:00
    
It now looks like this: SELECT user.user_id, user_netid, user_firstname, user_lastname, user_dmid, user_insnum, instype_id, user_birthday, user_insapproved FROM user JOIN signup ON signup.user_id = user.user_id JOIN schedule ON signup.schedule_id = schedule.schedule_id JOIN event ON event.event_id = schedule.event_id WHERE (user.instype_id = 3 OR user.instype_id = 4) AND signup.signup_attended =1 AND signup.signup_timestamp >= 1325376000 AND (event.activity_id=37 OR event.activity_id=40 OR event.activity_id=5); – thuey Mar 20 '12 at 16:03
2  
The query itself looks sound now. You will either have to provide some sample data in your question, use SQLFiddle.com (which might be tough with more than a couple tables to set up), or an approach that I use when debugging an issue like this is to start removing filters one by one until you get more results. This will at least tell you what filter is being too strict. This includes making some of your JOIN statements into LEFT JOIN, because it could be the JOINs that are being too strict here. A google for LEFT JOIN should clarify what it does if you are not sure :) – Justin Pihony Mar 20 '12 at 16:18
    
Okay, I'll try that out. Thanks for your help! – thuey Mar 20 '12 at 16:20

There is a few things that need to be fixed here. Every value that you are accessing needs to be associated with a table. Your first value "user.user_id" works but the rest are not associated with a table.(if that makes any sense).

Could you supply a layout of the tables that you are using.

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Either use syntax:

select * from user
join signup on user.userPrimaryKey=signup.userForeignKey
where conditions...

or:

select * from user,signup
where user.userPrimaryKey=signup.userForeignKey AND condition...

Like Marc B said your doing a cartesian join (every row of a table will associate to all rows of another table)

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