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I have grabbed some XML data using this piece of jQuery:

$.ajax({
    type: "POST",
    url: "siteList.xml",
    dataType: "xml",
    success: function(xml) {
        $(xml).find('wrapper').each(function(){
            $(this).find('site').each(function(){
                //check whether this is the last element...
            });
        });
    }
});

What I would like to do is: Check whether I am parsing the last site element from the XML I pulled in.

edit: I cannot (as far as I'm aware), do this:

$(this).find('site').each(function(){
    $(this).last(); //nope
    $(this).find('site').last(); //nope
});
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possible duplicate of jQuery: how do I check if an element is the last sibling? –  Felix Kling Mar 20 '12 at 15:45
    
Not a duplicate - this is about XML not Markup –  Neurofluxation Mar 20 '12 at 15:47
    
So? DOM is DOM. Whether you built it from XML or HTML does not matter (at least for traversal). I mean, you are also using .find here. Why should it be different for other functions? –  Felix Kling Mar 20 '12 at 15:48
1  
@Neurofluxation: What does the "M" in XML stand for? –  squint Mar 20 '12 at 15:48
    
I cannot (as far as I'm aware), do this... right, because the way you use .last here does not make sense. $(this).last() will be the same as $(this) as only one element is selected (this). As long as site's are not nested, $(this).find('site') will return an empty set. –  Felix Kling Mar 20 '12 at 15:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just use something like this to get the last site:

$(this).find('site').last()

Hope it helps!

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Take a look at the ':last' selector or the .last() function. You could do a test to see if the current site is the same as the last one.

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