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I'm trying to learn how to use the :before and :after pseudo elements. I'm trying to add a black background to the bottom of the page as a sticky footer but it doesn't seem to be working correctly.

Basically I have a repeating image as the background of the HTML element and then I add an absolute div positioned at the bottom with a solid black background.

I'd just like to point out that this is a learning experiment and not really how I'd achieve the same effect but what I'm trying is working in Firefox but not in Chrome!

Here's my CSS:

html {
    background-image: url('images/template/html-bg.jpg');
    background-position: top left;
    background-repeat: repeat-x;
    background-color: #0e0e0e;
    height: 100%;
    position: relative;
}

html:before {
    content: "";
    display: block;
    background-color: #000;
    width: 100%;
    height: 138px;
    bottom: 0px;
    position: absolute;
}

In FF the page is rendered as I'd expect but in Chrome the whole page is black... Any ideas, am I doing this wrong?

share|improve this question
2  
there is nothing "before" the html tag, aside from the DOCTYPE, i don't think that is valid CSS. –  Andres Ilich Mar 20 '12 at 15:43
    
So I should only use these pseudo elements on elements within the body tags? –  Gazillion Mar 20 '12 at 15:46
    
yes use in body instead of HTML tag –  sandeep Mar 20 '12 at 15:47
    
@Gazillion that is correct. –  Andres Ilich Mar 20 '12 at 15:53
    
Anyone want to put it as an answer so I can close this question? –  Gazillion Mar 20 '12 at 16:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your CSS should work as expected, as your pseudo-element should be drawn in the context of the initial containing block (the viewport, represented by the html element) anyway, which is exactly what Firefox is doing.

Your particular issue was reported as a Chrome bug, but it hasn't been addressed. As a workaround, you can apply your pseudo-element to body instead:

body:before {
    content: "";
    display: block;
    background-color: #000;
    width: 100%;
    height: 138px;
    bottom: 0px;
    position: absolute;
}

Depending on your layout, you may need to either keep your html rule or change it to body as well.

share|improve this answer
    
That's exactly what it is! I feel special having come across a Chrome bug :P Thanks for the help! –  Gazillion Mar 20 '12 at 17:26
    
I don't believe it's a bug per se. Is HTML supposed to have "content" at all? HTML is the canvas. I wouldn't be surprised if a browser would implicitly slap display:none on all elements within a HTML element except <body>. Otherwise you'd always have some whitespace in the DOM tree above and below the body. –  Mr Lister Mar 20 '12 at 17:39
    
@Mr Lister: Here's my take: html is the root element in the DOM. head and body are its children, both of which are also represented as DOM nodes. The :before and :after pseudo-elements describe inserting content before or after an element's document tree content, so they should work with the html element because its document tree content consists of the head and body elements. Like you said, html is the "canvas", where visual elements are drawn, and head does have an initial style of display: none anyway. –  BoltClock Mar 20 '12 at 18:14
    
I can go with most of that, but not your punchline "head does have an initial style of display: none anyway." That cannot possibly be true, because the children of an element with display:none are never drawn, never! Here, "This behavior cannot be overridden by setting the 'display' property on the descendants." SeaMonkey's DOM Inspector also tells me that the HTML element of this page has display:block. –  Mr Lister Mar 20 '12 at 18:22
    

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