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I was hoping someone could help me with a little issue I'm having trouble understanding in c++.

If I create a private enum within a class in a header file (Example.h) as shown below:

class Example
{
    private:
        enum ValueType
        {
           INTEGER,
           BOOLEAN,
           BLOB,
           UNKNOWN
        };
}

Then how can I access these values from a source file (private method) to be used as a return type (Example.cpp)

#include "Example.h"

...

ValueType // <-- How can I declare this correctly? compiler complains
Example::returnMyType(const ValueType p_valueType)
{
    switch(p_valueType)
    {
        case INTEGER;
        return "INTEGER";  
        break;
   ...
   ...
}

I'm just unsure how to declare this as the return type.

Also I know this function is pointless but it's only for putting across the concept I'm trying to understand.

I was also wondering how could I access these values from within the switch statment?

#include "Example.h"

...

ValueType // <-- How can I declare this correctly? compiler complains
Example::returnMyType(const ValueType p_valueType)
{
    switch(p_valueType)
    {
        case Example::BLOB; // <-- Is this how to access 
        return "INTEGER";  
        break;
   ...
   ...
}
share|improve this question
    
yes all are private –  alias error Mar 20 '12 at 15:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You should write that as:

Example::ValueType Example::returnMyType(const ValueType p_valueType)
{
     //...
}

That is, you've to use Example::ValueType from outside the class, when defining members functions and from the member functions.

--

From your comment:

I see, it the enum were public would this also be the case?

Yes. It doesn't matter if it is public or private.

Accessibility (public, protected and private) only determines who is allowed to access, it doesn't determine how to access.

share|improve this answer
    
I see, it the enum were public would this also be the case? –  alias error Mar 20 '12 at 15:54
    
@aliaserror: Yes. It doesn't matter if it is public or private. public or private only determines who is allowed to access, it doesn't determine how to access. –  Nawaz Mar 20 '12 at 15:55
    
thank you so much –  alias error Mar 20 '12 at 15:56

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