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There is a class A and it has the following operator() implementation:

void A::operator()(...parameters...) const 
{
    // operator body
}

What does this const mean?

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possible duplicate of about const member function –  phresnel Mar 20 '12 at 16:42

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Methods in C++ can be marked as const like in the above example to indicate that the function does not modify the instance. To enforce this, the this pointer is of type const A* const within the method.

Normally, the this pointer within a method is A* const to indicate that we cannot change what this points to. That is, so that we cannot do this = new A().

But when the type is const A* const we also cannot change any of the properties.

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The reason that you can't change this is because it is not an lvalue expression, not because it has a const qualified type which it doesn't. In fact you cannot have rvalues of const qualified non-class types. –  Charles Bailey Mar 20 '12 at 17:47
    
@CharlesBailey: Where did you find that information? The sources I've consulted explain that the pointer is of type const A* const: publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/lnxpcomp/v8v101/… msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ytk2ae82.aspx –  Cam Mar 20 '12 at 18:12
    
In the standard, section about this in chapter 9 and section about value categories in chapter 3. –  Charles Bailey Mar 20 '12 at 18:31
    
@CharlesBailey: Well that's certainly the most definitive source. Thanks for correcting the info I provided. For others interested, see cs.technion.ac.il/users/yechiel/CS/C++draft/ISO-CPP-body.pdf page 155. Thanks Charles! –  Cam Mar 20 '12 at 18:38
    
However, just to confuse the issue, const member functions can modify members explicitly marked as mutable. –  Ferruccio Mar 20 '12 at 20:14

As already amply described, it means that the method will not modify the observable state of the object. But also, and very importantly, it means the method can be called on a const object, pointer, or reference - a non-const method cannot. ie:

class A
{
public:
    void Method1() const
    {
    }

    void Method2()
    {
    }
};

int main( int /*argc*/, char * /*argv*/ )
{

    const A a;
    a.Method1(); //ok.
    a.Method2(); //compiler error!

    return 0;
}
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please do not assume that it won't modify the object, only the visible state remains unchanged. –  phresnel Mar 20 '12 at 17:01
    
Also already amply stated. : ) So far I'm the only person to point out that only const methods can be called on a const object. Where's my upvotes!?!? –  Grimm The Opiner Mar 20 '12 at 17:15
    
actually, you have an upvote from me, but also a downvote, because const methods may change the object. But they shall not change the externally visible state. –  phresnel Mar 21 '12 at 15:41
    
I thought it was pretty clear that I was summarising the answers above, before adding the important bit. I've now polished it. Still, now I must find the downvoter and stalk them across the internet forever! Where am I gonna find the time for that!? –  Grimm The Opiner Mar 21 '12 at 15:55
    
You want to use '@' next time, so I will be notified ;) My (virtual) downvote vanishes, summing to +1. Btw, you've not received any real downvote. –  phresnel Mar 22 '12 at 12:20

That the method uses this as a const A* and then can only call other const methods.

See this entry of the CPP FAQ.

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2  
Small nitpick - the type actually becomes const A* const –  Cam Mar 20 '12 at 16:39
    
@Cam: no, the type is simply const A*. this is an rvalue which is why you can't assign to it or take its address, not because it's const. –  Charles Bailey Mar 20 '12 at 17:39

A const member function promises to not change the observable state of the object.

Under the hood, it might still change state, e.g. of mutable members. However, mutable members should never be visible from anywhere outside the class' interface, i.e. you should never attempt to lie to client code, because client code may validly expect that const functions don't tweak the object's outer hull. Think of mutable as an optimization tool (e.g. for caching and memoization).


Example for mutability:

You have a quadtree class. Under the hood, the quadtree is build up lazily, i.e. on demand; this lazyness is hidden from users of the class. Now, a query-method on that quadtree should be const, because querying a quadtree is expected to not change the quadtree. How do you implement const-correctness and lazyness without breaking C++' rules? Use mutable. Now you have a quadtree that for the user looks const, but you know that under the hood, there's still a lot of change:

class Quadtree {
public:
    Quadtree (int depth);
    Foo query (Bar which) const;

private:
    mutable Node node_;
};
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It means that calling the operator will not change state of the object.

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Not necessarily, thanks to const_cast and mutable. –  dan04 Mar 20 '12 at 16:36
1  
@dan04: Ok, so it means "will not change state of the object... unless someone cheats!" :P –  aldo Mar 20 '12 at 16:41
    
@dan04: mutating a const value via const_cast yields undefined behaviour. –  phresnel Mar 20 '12 at 16:43
    
@piokuc: Maybe refine this to "observable state". –  phresnel Mar 20 '12 at 16:44
1  
@piokuc: Example: You have a quadtree class. Under the hood, the quadtree is build up lazily, i.e. on demand; this lazyness is hidden from users of the class. Now, a query-method on that quadtree should be const, because querying a quadtree is expected to not change the quadtree. How do you implement const-correctness and lazyness without breaking C++' rules? Use mutable. Now you have a quadtree that for the user looks const, but you know that under the hood, there's still a lot of change. –  phresnel Mar 20 '12 at 16:52

const keyword specifies that the function is a "read-only" function that does not modify the object for which it is called.

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