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So I am not sure why this is becoming so hard for me, but I need to sort high to low and low to high.

For high to low I have:

int a, b;
int temp;
int sortTheNumbers = len - 1;

for (a = 0; a < sortTheNumbers; ++a) {
    for (b = 0; b < sortTheNumbers; ++b) {
        if (array[b] < array[b + 1]) {
            temp = array[b];
            array[b] = array[b + 1];
            array[b + 1] = temp;
        }
    }
}

However, I can't for the life of me get it to work in reverse (low to high), I have thought the logic through and it always returns 0's for all the values. Any help appreciated!

The bigger picture is that I have a JTable with 4 columns, each column with entries of numbers, names, or dates. I need to be able to sort those back and forth.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Post what you have tried for low to high, and where it's running into trouble. It should only be a 1 character change (you can guess which character). –  Mark Peters Mar 20 '12 at 16:38
    
sorting apart, maybe a linked list would help you to store the values AND to trasverse them from highest to lowest and back. no need to sort them all the time. –  vulkanino Mar 20 '12 at 16:40
2  
You say you are doing that to sort a JTable: it would be easier to use a sorter rather than reimplementing a sort algorithm manually. –  assylias Mar 20 '12 at 16:58

8 Answers 8

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Unless you think using already available sort functions and autoboxing is cheating:

Integer[] arr =
    { 12, 67, 1, 34, 9, 78, 6, 31 };
    Arrays.sort(arr, new Comparator<Integer>()
    {
        @Override
        public int compare(Integer x, Integer y)
        {
            return x - y;
        }
    });

    System.out.println("low to high:" + Arrays.toString(arr));

Prints low to high:[1, 6, 9, 12, 31, 34, 67, 78]

if you need high to low change x-y to y-x in the comparator

share|improve this answer

You are never visiting the last element of the array.

Also, you should be aware that bubble sort is pretty inefficent and you could just use Arrays.sort().

share|improve this answer
    
Why would he need to "visit" the last element of the array? There's nothing to swap it with. He does however compare it with the second-last element and swap them if they're out of order. Maybe I'm not understanding what you're suggesting, could you include a test input that doesn't work with the code he posted? –  Mark Peters Mar 20 '12 at 16:42
    
Seems Arrays.sort is an eazy one , any drawback for that one ? –  Renjith K N Oct 22 '13 at 12:23

The only thing you need to do to change the sort order is change

if (array[b] < array[b + 1])

to

if (array[b] > array[b + 1])

Although, as others have noted, it's very inefficient! :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Yes I figured all I had to do was switch that sign, but it returns 0's instead of the actual values, as if it is erasing them. As for bugs, it seems unlikely since the code for the high to low is exactly the same within its own method, using the same reset variables. –  Austin Mar 20 '12 at 17:01
    
Sorry, I've re-examined it and I retract the bit about bugs! It's still a super-slow bubble-sort though ;-) –  dty Mar 20 '12 at 17:02
  public class sorting {
  public static void main(String arg[])throws Exception{
  int j[]={1,28,3,4,2};   //declaring array with disordered values  

  for(int s=0;s<=j.length-1;s++){
  for(int k=0;k<=j.length-2;k++){
         if(j[k]>j[k+1]){   //comparing array values

    int temp=0;    
    temp=j[k];     //storing value of array in temp variable 

j[k]=j[k+1];    //swaping values
j[k+1]=temp;    //now storing temp value in array


}    //end if block             
}  // end inner loop    
}
//end outer loop

for(int s=0;s<=j.length-1;s++){
System.out.println(j[s]);       //retrieving values of array in ascending order 

}   

}
}
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This works well –  ZA brohi Jul 10 '13 at 12:26

You need a more efficient sort. like mergesort. try www.geekviewpoint.com and go to sort

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If you just want sort the int array: Use the quicksort... It's not a lot of code and it's N*lgN in avarage or N^2 in worst-case. To sort multiple data, use the Java Compare (as above) or a stable sorting algorithm

static void quicksort(int[] a,int l, int r){
    if(r <= l) return;
    int pivot = partition(a,l,r);

    //Improvement, sort the smallest part first
    if((pivot-l) < (r-pivot)){
        quicksort(a,l,pivot-1);
        quicksort(a,pivot+1,r);
    }else{
        quicksort(a,pivot+1,r);
        quicksort(a,l,pivot-1);
    }
}

static int partition(int[] a,int l,int r){
    int i = l-1;
    int j = r;
    int v = a[r];
    while(true){
        while(less(a[++i],v));  //-> until bigger
        while((less(v,a[--j]) && (j != i)));    //-> until smaller and not end
        if(i >= j){
            break;
        }
        exch(a,i,j);
    }
    exch(a,i,r);
    return i;
}
share|improve this answer

You just need to write one string Arrays.sort(arr) for low to hight and Arrays.sort(arr, Collections.reverseOrder()) for hight to low

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You can try with bubble sort: Example shown below

int[] numbers = { 4, 7, 20, 2, 56 };
int temp;

for (int i = 0; i < numbers.length; i++)
{
       for(int j = 0; j < numbers.length; j++)
       {
                if(numbers[i] > numbers[j + 1])
                {
                            temp = numbers [j + 1];
                            numbers [j + 1]= numbers [i];
                            numbers [i] = temp;
                }
        }
}

for (int i = 0; i < numbers.length; i++)
{
         System.out.println(numbers[i].toString());
}
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