Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a list of dictionaries and I wanted to group the data. I used the following:

group_list = []
for key, items in itertools.groupby(res, operator.itemgetter('dept')):
    group_list.append({key:list(items)})

For data that looks like this

[{'dept':1, 'age':10, 'name':'Sam'},
{'dept':1, 'age':12, 'name':'John'},
.
.
.
{'dept':2,'age':20, 'name':'Mary'},
{'dept':2,'age':11, 'name':'Mark'},
{'dept':2,'age':11, 'name':'Tom'}]

the output would be:

[{1:[{'dept':1, 'age':10, 'name':'Sam'},
    {'dept':1, 'age':12, 'name':'John'}],
 {2:[{'dept':2,'age':20, 'name':'Mary'},
    {'dept':2,'age':11, 'name':'Mark'},
    {'dept':2,'age':11, 'name':'Tom'}]
...
]

Now if I want to group using multiple keys say 'dept' and 'age', the above mentioned method returns

[{(2, 20): [{'age': 20, 'dept': 2, 'name': 'Mary'}]},
 {(2, 11): [{'age': 11, 'dept': 2, 'name': 'Mark'},
            {'age': 11, 'dept': 2, 'name': 'Tom'}]},
 {(1, 10): [{'age': 10, 'dept': 1, 'name': 'Sam'}]},
 {(1, 12): [{'age': 12, 'dept': 1, 'name': 'John'}]}]

The desired output would be:

[
    {
        2: {
            20: [
                {
                    'age': 20,
                    'dept': 2,
                    'name': 'Mary'
                }
            ]
        },
        {
            11: [
                {
                    'age': 11,
                    'dept': 2,
                    'name': 'Mark'
                },
                {
                    'age': 11,
                    'dept': 2,
                    'name': 'Tom'
                }
            ]
        }
    },
    {
        1: {
            10: [
                {
                    'age': 10,
                    'dept': 1,
                    'name': 'Sam'
                }
            ]
        },
        {
            12: [
                {
                    'age': 12,
                    'dept': 1,
                    'name': 'John'
                }
            ]
        }
    }
]

Can it be done with itertools? Or do I need to write that code myself? Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Do you really wnat to have a list of dictionaries in the output? Each outter dictionary on your list appears to have a single key - would not a simpl dictionary (with keys=(1,2) for the example above) suffice? –  jsbueno Mar 20 '12 at 17:27
    
I need this cause I am building a small reporting engine for Django. Groups would normally be interpreted as for loops in the template. I them to be hierarchical cause every group will have different data. –  thelinuxer Mar 20 '12 at 17:39

3 Answers 3

Absolutely. You just need to apply itertools.groupby() for the second criterion first, then the other.

share|improve this answer
1  
Which involves some custom code, that happens to use itertools. :) –  Amber Mar 20 '12 at 17:25

You would need to write a (probably recursive) bit of code to do this yourself - itertools doesn't have a tree-builder in it.

share|improve this answer
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Thanks everyone for your help. Here is how I did it:

import itertools, operator

l = [{'dept':1, 'age':10, 'name':'Sam'},
        {'dept':1, 'age':12, 'name':'John'},
        {'dept':2,'age':20, 'name':'Mary'},
        {'dept':2,'age':11, 'name':'Mark'},
        {'dept':2,'age':11, 'name':'Tom'}]

groups = ['dept', 'age', 'name'] 

groups.reverse()
def hierachical_data(data, groups):
    g = groups[-1]
    g_list = []
    for key, items in itertools.groupby(data, operator.itemgetter(g)):
        g_list.append({key:list(items)})
    groups = groups[0:-1]
    if(len(groups) != 0):
        for e in g_list:
            for k,v in e.items():
                e[k] = hierachical_data(v, groups)

    return g_list

print hierachical_data(l, groups)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.