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I've been using ReaderWriterLockSlim to synchronize reads/writes and it has worked quite well so far.

I have a collection of objects and read/write locks are maintained in a Dictionary<string, ReaderWriterLockSlim>. I have a scenario where I need to acquire multiple read locks atomically. I'm certain I don't have any code that would allow one thread to attempt to hold more than one write lock concurrently, which makes me think that the code below will work without problems.

If I were trying the approach below with write locks instead of read locks, I'm almost certain I would end up with deadlocks unless I can ensure that locking always happens in the same order (which I can't in my case).

Does anyone see any problems with this code assuming the following:

  1. Elsewhere, no thread holding a write lock would be allowed to hold any other lock (read or write)
  2. Multiple threads could hold any number of read locks concurrently

Any thoughts?

public void WithReaderLocksForItemsNamed(string[] itemNames, Action action)
    {
        // this gets locks for the items specified from my internation dictionary
        ReaderWriterLockSlim[ ] locks = LocksForItemsNamed( itemNames ) ;

        try
        {
            foreach( var @lock in locks )
            {
                @lock.EnterReadLock( ) ;
            }

            action( ) ;
        }
        finally
        {
            foreach( var @lock in locks )
            {
                if (@lock.IsReadLockHeld)
                {
                    @lock.ExitReadLock( ) ;
                }
            }
        }
    }
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2  
Could you please explain why are using multiple locks for the same action? –  Scott Mar 20 '12 at 17:26
    
The action relies on all items to remain unchanged while it is performed. An example in the SQL world would be creating a view that joins two tables and I need to ensure that the operation doesn't fail because one of the referenced tables is getting changed while the view is being created. It's completely OK, if the tables change right after the fact... –  Igor Pashchuk Mar 20 '12 at 17:31
    
The use of multiple locks will always introduce a good chance of deadlock. This is actually why ReaderWriterLockSlim exists - to solve the problem of using two locks at the same time to protect a resource. What kind of resources are you protecting with the locks? Is your program massively multi-threaded? –  Scott Mar 20 '12 at 17:46
    
so what's the problem with your code anyway? do you get a deadlock? –  Bond Mar 20 '12 at 17:51
    
@Scott, the functionality is conceptually similar to the SQL view example I mentioned. An operation needs to be perfomed while the resources that the operation depends on are guaranteed to remain unchanged (hence read locks). The program is not massively multi-threaded per se but there are events (triggered from the outside) that can cause resources to get deleted and recreated. I want to ensure that my operations do not fail during those updates. –  Igor Pashchuk Mar 20 '12 at 18:00
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2 Answers 2

It looks OK but you might need a re-entrancy lock on the method itself and of course, one where you iterate your source list to get the locks.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is an old question but I thought it would still be good to update it with the final solution. Although I never experienced problems with the above, I applied the prudent practice of exiting locks in the reverse order they were acquired. Thus the final code looks something like this:

public void WithReaderLocksForItemsNamed(string[] itemNames, Action action)
{
    // this gets locks for the items specified from my internation dictionary
    ReaderWriterLockSlim[ ] locks = LocksForItemsNamed( itemNames ) ;

    try
    {
        foreach( var @lock in locks )
        {
            @lock.EnterReadLock( ) ;
        }

        action( ) ;
    }
    finally
    {
        foreach( var @lock in locks.Reverse() )
        {
            if (@lock.IsReadLockHeld)
            {
                @lock.ExitReadLock( ) ;
            }
        }
    }
}
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