Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

well, I just made such a "hello world" non-Flex app in FlashDevelop and packaged it as AIR. Looks like a fine tool for the "hello world" task :)

When online articles and tutorials focus on Flex when discussing AIR, is this purely because of Adobe propaganda that wants to steer people away from the tried-and-proven and towards their latest project? (that many people don't like, judging by 'flex sucks' googling). Or is there some actual solid reasons why AIR apps should be made with Flex and not with the widgets from previous libraries?

share|improve this question
2  
I voted to close; as I feel this post has some "inflammatory" tone and does not ask a technical question. To answer your specific question: AIR specific APIs are completely independent of Flex and you can build AIR apps w/o using Flex. There are some Flex components with dependencies to AIR, however. –  JeffryHouser Mar 20 '12 at 18:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There's nothing that dictates you must use Flex when writing an AIR application. Furthermore I think you can google "any word here" sucks and find people who will agree, there's a lot of complaining on the internet. Depending on what you're trying to develop Flex can be a great platform for building on top of, that said if you already have a library of pure AS3 components that you believe will better serve your purpose then you can go right ahead and use those. Also take note that Flex is in the process of being migrated from Adobe to Apache, and as of Flex version 3 has been open source aside from the data-visualization (aka charting and the advanced data grid) which is also going to be open sourced and the source could be previously obtained using an extraction jar utility provided with the premium builder. So anything you don't like about the framework, also referred to as things that suck, you can fix, and if you become a contributor once the apache project is finalized you can contribute your fix and get others contributions.

Flex components generally are generally built so most of them can be used in all currently potential contexts, that is on the desktop or on any mobile device. The controls and other APIs included as part of Flex make this work easier in my opinion but don't stop you in any way from writing your own components (if you so choose you can use the framework for most things and write components the old way and make it work, however the framework has life-cycles that aren't inherent in AS3 or the player run-time itself). Keep in mind Flex is just another AS3 framework but it's one that's been worked on by Adobe engineers who have access to the player code as well as well as the flash player teams expertise.

I agree with the statement Flex sucks as much as I agree with the statement, jack-hammer's suck. Sure working with a jack-hammer isn't the most relaxing pleasant experience, and takes some time to get used to, but try breaking up concrete without one and you might appreciate it, hopefully the analogy makes sense to you. I'm not saying you always need a jack-hammer (ie nailing up paintings) but sometimes it makes more sense than a hammer (breaking up concrete). Choose the right tool for the job.

I'm working on a small game and doing it as a pure AS3 project wrapped in AIR for deployment to mobile, so I'm not saying always use Flex, I'm saying you should try to understand it's place and what components/features it offers then determine if you'll benefit from using it or not (you can always say you don't need it but that doesn't mean you'd be better off without it). And yes to some degree Adobe was undoubtedly trying to push extra tooling/technology at devs since that is in part how they make money.

share|improve this answer
    
The data Visualization components were open sourced as Part of the Flex 4 release I think. It is expected that the components will be donated to Apache if they haven't been already. +1 for the Jackhammer analogy –  JeffryHouser Mar 20 '12 at 18:38
    
@wvxvw How is this statement wrong? You can write an AIR application without the Flex framework. Are you talking in terms of the compiler tools used? I'd still argue they are outside of the scope of the Flex framework itself even though you download them together. If I am wrong please elaborate a bit and I'll modify my answer. –  shaunhusain Mar 20 '12 at 20:30

There is nothing preventing you from creating an AIR app using pure actionscript. In fact, in the Flash Builder 4 (made by Adobe), there is a discrete option to create an ActionScript only project targeting AIR. I don't think Adobe is trying to steer you away from using legacy Flash/AS3 code, but they will go to great lengths to promote their latest, greatest software. And since Flex and AIR are released in tandem, you are going to see lots of posts that tie them together.

When targeting AIR, you can use all the existing AS3 code you like, including MinimalComps, game libraries like flixel, or whatever you want. Bfxr-standalone is a good example of an AIR app using MinimalComps instead of Flex components.

Flex is great for applications that work with a lot of data or internet services. If you think you can benefit from some of the Flex components, then use them. If not, don't.

share|improve this answer

I don't know why Adobe made these decisions, but certainly some AIR specific classes are only available in connection with Flex framework. For example, WindowedApplication is a class commonly used for an entry point in projects that utilize Flex framework and target AIR runtime. It doesn't end with this particular class, there are couple other classes in AIR runtime that specifically target Flex framework.

You still can write a program for AIR that doesn't depend on Flex framework, but it looks like the marketing idea behind these two was to advance one combined with the other.

share|improve this answer
1  
WindowedApplication is within the Flex framework, Flex has been extended to have more capabilities built on top of features exposed from the underlying operating system through AIR but these are not capabilities that are not accessible in AS3, for example you can create a mobile application that extends Sprite as the base class and runs in the context of AIR and has all the other capabilities exposed by AIR such as geolocation APIs. I think all your saying is they extended Flex to include features exposed by AIR and therefore you can do more with Flex if in the context of AIR. –  shaunhusain Mar 20 '12 at 20:42
    
WindowedApplication is not in the AIR runtime it's not defined in the airglobal.swc it's defined in spark.components package case re-opened. WindowedApplication -> Application -> SkinnableContainer -> SkinnableComponent -> UIComponent, this is the extension chain and this is all in Flex source code. –  shaunhusain Mar 20 '12 at 21:43
    
I see AIR itself as an abstraction layer just like the Flash Player itself, except in the case of AIR it's an abstraction from the OS level rather than from the browser. Nothing in either run-time requires that you use Flex, Flex offers capabilities only within the limitations of AS3 and the capabilities exposed by the Flash Player runtime or the AIR runtime. As you probably know MXML compiles to AS3 before being compiled to ABC which can then be interpreted by the virtual machine into machine code, and the results of which are presented to the user through the run-time container. –  shaunhusain Mar 20 '12 at 21:50
    
I downvoted this for reasons @shaunhusain has already explained. –  JeffryHouser Mar 20 '12 at 22:27
    
@wvxvw I can respect your confusion; but WindowedApplication is documented as part of the Flex runtime; not the AIR runtime. Some Flex classes have a dependency to AIR; but nothing in AIR has a dependency to Flex. Yes, AS3 has anonymous functions, but they are baked into the language and therefore runtimes. Flex is just a 3rd party library. –  JeffryHouser Mar 21 '12 at 17:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.