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I had a problem where my program was going to infinite loop. I narrowed down the problem and it turned out that keyword require was causing that. Hence to understand the problem I wrote a simple hello world program which has the exact file include structure as the bigger program. It has a main file test.pl which calls helloWorld from test2.pm. test2.pm calls the same routine from test1.pm.

Test.pl

#!/usr/bin/perl
use test1;
use test2;
print "In test\n";
test2::helloWorld();

Test1.pm

#!/usr/bin/perl
package test1;
use test2;
require "test.pl";
@ISA = qw (Exporter);
@Export = qw(
    helloWorld
    );

sub helloWorld {
print "Hello world: Test1\n";
}

Test2.pm:

#!/usr/bin/perl
package test2;  
use test1;
@ISA = qw (Exporter);
@Export = qw(
    helloWorld
    );

sub helloWorld {
test1::helloWorld();
}

This is the output from the program:

In test
Hello world: Test1
In test
Hello world: Test1

I wish to understand why it printed the output twice? If I comment out #require "test.pl" from test1.pm, it only prints output once.

Test1.pm (require line commented out)

#!/usr/bin/perl
    package test1;
    use test2;
    #require "test.pl";
    @ISA = qw (Exporter);
    @Export = qw(
         helloWorld
            );
    sub helloWorld {
        print "Hello world: Test1\n";
    }

And this is the output now:

In test
Hello world: Test1

I think if I understand this, I can tackle my real problem. Thanks for any help in this regard :)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When a perl script executes, the files loaded via require and use so far are kept in the %INC hash, in order to prevent code from being executed more than once, and to prevent infinite mutual recursion. However, you are importing your main script from one of the modules it imports, so it will run once during the import process, and again as the script. Here is the order in which your files are loaded and executed:

  1. test.pl runs and sees it needs to load test1.pm.
    1. test1.pm is loaded, and it sees it needs to load test2.pm
      1. test2.pm is loaded, and it sees it needs to load test1.pm, but test1.pm is already loaded, so it continues.
      2. test2::helloWorld is defined, and test2.pm returns.
    2. Back in test1, it now sees that test.pl needs to be loaded.
      1. In test.pl, we try to load test1.pm and test2.pm, but they have already been loaded via require.
      2. Print "In test" and call test2::helloWorld
    3. Back in test1.pm, define test1::helloWorld
  2. Back in test.pl, print "In test" and call test2::helloWorld.
share|improve this answer
    
A much better explanation than mine. –  Schwern Mar 20 '12 at 19:41
1  
Thanks for the explanation...it helped a lot. I just wanted to ask one more thing. As you mentioned in step 2.2 it prints in test" and call test2::helloWorld". But why does it print and call the function at the first place? Keyword require is just used to INLCLUDE the file not to execute it? Is this not correct? –  Richeek Mar 20 '12 at 21:04
2  
require compiles and runs (so does use). require does little more than read the file and eval the contents, but just once. Otherwise things like @ISA = qw(Exporter); would not happen. –  Schwern Mar 21 '12 at 4:55

There's a bunch of errors in your code, some related some not.

  • The package name should match the name of the .pm file, including the case.

You're partially getting away with that because you're on a case-insensitive filesystem (OS X or Windows). use and require remember if they've already loaded a module, but they remember the filename, not the module name. When you say use test1 Perl will be looking for test1.pm, but it loads Test1.pm instead. Next time it sees use test1 it sees it has not loaded test1.pm and loads it again... and again... and again.

  • The variable to put your function exports into is @EXPORT not @Export.

Case matters with variable names.

  • Requiring test.pl in Test1.pm or Test2.pm sets up a circular dependency.

This is the problem. Perl has not finished compiling test.pl when it loads Test1.pm (use happens at compile-time). Test1.pm compiles and then is asked to load test.pl (require happens at run-time) which it does. Then the original compile of test.pl completes and it runs its code.

You have a similar potential problem because Test1.pm uses Test2.pm and Test2.pm uses Test1.pm.

This is confusing, it's kinda like time travel. Let's make it simple: avoid circular dependencies.

There's no reason for Test1.pm to use test.pl. In general, modules should never load a program.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your comment...actually file names are same as module names. It just so happened that when I typed the names first letter got capitalized :) I will definitely change Export to EXPORT as that is plain wrong! –  Richeek Mar 20 '12 at 21:06
    
+1 for the last two sentences especially. –  chepner Mar 21 '12 at 14:33

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