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I'm using FFT's for audio processing, and I've come up with some potentially very fast ways of doing the bit reversal needed which might be of use to others, but because of the size of my FFT's (8192), I'm trying to reduce memory usage / cache flushing do to size of lookup tables or code, and increase performance. I've seen lots of clever bit reversal routines; they all allow you can feed them with any arbitrary value and get a bit reversed output, but FFT's don't need that flexibility since they go in a predictable sequence. First let me state what I have tried and/or figured out since it may be the fastest to date and you can see the problem, then I'll ask the question.

1) I've written a program to generate straight through, unlooped x86 source code that can be pasted into my FFT code, which reads an audio sample, multiplies it by a window value (that's a lookup table itself) and then just places the resulting value in it's proper bit reversed sorted position by absolute values within the x86 addressing modes like: movlps [edi+1876],xmm0. This is the absolute fastest way to do this for smaller FFT sizes. The problem is when I write straight through code to handle 8192 values, the code grows beyond the L1 instruction cache size and performance drops way down. Of course in contrast, a 32K bit reversal lookup table mixed with a 32K window table, plus other stuff, is also too big to fit the L1 data cache, and performance drops way down, but that's the way I'm currently doing it.

2) I've found patterns in the bit reversal sequence that can be exploited to reduce lookup table size, for example using 4 bit numbers (0..15) as an example, the bit reversal sequence looks like: 0,8,4,12,2,10,6,14|1,5,9,13,3,11,7,15. First thing that can be seen is that the last 8 numbers are the same as the first 8 +1, so I can chop my LUT half. If I look at the difference between the numbers there is more redundancy, so if I start with a zero in a register and want to add values to it to get the next bit reversed number they would be: +0,+8,-4,+8,-10,+8,-4,+8 and the same for the second half. As can be seen, I could have a lookup table of just 0 and -10 because the +8's and -4's always show up in a predictable way. The code would be unrolled to handle 4 values per loop: one would be a lookup table read, and the other 3 would be straight code for +8, -4, +8, before looping around again. Then a second loop could handle the 1,5,9,13,3,11,7,15 sequence. This is great, because I can now chop down my lookup table by another factor of 4. This scales up the same way for an 8192 size FFT. I can now get by with a 4K size LUT instead of 32K. I can exploit the same pattern and double the size of my code and chop down the LUT by another half yet again, however far I want to go. But in order to eliminate the LUT altogether, I'm back to the prohibitive code size.

For large FFT sizes, I believe that this #2 solution is the absolute fastest to date, since a relatively small percentage of lookup table reads need to be done, and every algorithm I currently find on the web requires too many serial/dependency calculations which can't be vectorized.

The question is, is there an algorithm that can increment numbers so the MSB acts like the LSB, and so on? In other words (in binary): 0000, 1000, 0100, 1100, 0010, etc… I've tried to think up some way, and so far, short of a bunch of nested loops, I can't seem to find a way for a fast and simple algorithm that is a mirror image of simply adding 1 to the LSB of a number. Yet it seems like there should be a way.

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3  
+1 It's not often we get a question about bit-reversals. Everyone seems to just rely on FFTW as a sort of "black box" - without realizing how expensive the bit-reversed copy really is. –  Mysticial Mar 20 '12 at 22:22

3 Answers 3

One other approach to consider: take a well known bit reversal algorithm - typically a few masks, shifts, and ORs - then implement this with SSE, so you get e.g. 8 x 16 bit bit reversals for the price of one. For 16 bits you need 5*log2(N) = 20 instructions, so the aggregate throughput would be 2.5 instructions per bit reversal.

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Yes, I've also thought about that and may give it a try. However a lot of additional overhead gets added because now all those 8 separate results need to get pulled out of the SSE registers one at a time into the general purpose registers so they can be used for addressing memory. –  Ken Elhardt Mar 21 '12 at 16:08
    
You can either use _mm_extract_epi16 to pull each element out of the vector in turn, or maybe process blocks multiples of 8 in your inner loop and store a small block of bit reversed indices. Cost in the former case is one SSE instruction, or in the latter case it is 0.125 of a store per point plus 1 load (both cached, so may be effectively free). –  Paul R Mar 21 '12 at 16:30

This is the most trivial and straightforward solution (in C):

void BitReversedIncrement(unsigned *var, int bit)
{
  unsigned c, one = 1u << bit;
  do {
    c = *var & one;
    (*var) ^= one;
    one >>= 1;
  } while (one && c);
}

The main problem with is the conditional branches, which are often costly on modern CPUs. You have one conditional branch per bit.

You can do reversed increments by working on several bits at a time, e.g. 3 if ints are 32-bit:

void BitReversedIncrement2(unsigned *var, int bit)
{
  unsigned r = *var, t = 0;

  while (bit >= 2 && !t)
  {
    unsigned tt = (r >> (bit - 2)) & 7;
    t = (07351624 >> (tt * 3)) & 7;
    r ^= ((tt ^ t) << (bit - 2));
    bit -= 3;
  }

  if (bit >= 0 && !t)
  {
    t = r & ((1 << (bit + 1)) - 1);
    r ^= t;
    t <<= 2 - bit;
    t = (07351624 >> (t * 3)) & 7;
    t >>= 2 - bit;
    r |= t;
  }

  *var = r;
}

This is better, you only have 1 conditional branch per 3 bits.

If your CPU supports 64-bit ints, you can work on 4 bits at a time:

void BitReversedIncrement3(unsigned *var, int bit)
{
  unsigned r = *var, t = 0;

  while (bit >= 3 && !t)
  {
    unsigned tt = (r >> (bit - 3)) & 0xF;
    t = (0xF7B3D591E6A2C48ULL >> (tt * 4)) & 0xF;
    r ^= ((tt ^ t) << (bit - 3));
    bit -= 4;
  }

  if (bit >= 0 && !t)
  {
    t = r & ((1 << (bit + 1)) - 1);
    r ^= t;
    t <<= 3 - bit;
    t = (0xF7B3D591E6A2C48ULL >> (t * 4)) & 0xF;
    t >>= 3 - bit;
    r |= t;
  }

  *var = r;
}

Which is even better. And the only look-up table (07351624 or 0xF7B3D591E6A2C48) is tiny and likely encoded as an immediate instruction operand.

You can further improve the code if the bit position for the reversed "1" is a known constant. Just unroll the while loop into nested ifs, substitute the reversed one bit position constant.

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Thanks for the code samples. With conditional branches and loops they look like they might be slower than the bit reversal code I've come across for arbitrary numbers. –  Ken Elhardt Mar 21 '12 at 16:26
    
Try Again: Thanks for the code samples. With conditional branches and loops they look like they might be slower than the bit reversal code I've come across. I've been thinking further and I could maybe do straight through code for the first 8 bits, inside 4 to 5 outer nested loops, the latter which would XOR single bits to toggle them on and off. That would mean I could do 256 bit reversals with no calculations at all, followed by some outer loops of just exclusive ors which rarely get hit. The code would be kind of large, but nothing that would come close to overflowing the instruction cache. –  Ken Elhardt Mar 21 '12 at 16:41

For larger FFTs, paying attention to cache blocking (minimizing total uncovered cache miss cycles) can have a far larger effect on performance than optimization of the cycle count taken by indexing bit reversal. Make sure not to de-optimize a bigger effect by a larger cycle count while optimizing the smaller effect. For small FFTs, where everything fits in cache, LUTs can be a good solution as long as you pay attention to any load-use hazards by making sure things are or can be pipelined appropriately.

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Because of the way my code works, in that after doing one FFT, I need to do 26 inverse FFT's, each with its own circular buffer, the L1 data cache is pretty much flushed out by the time I circle around and start the process again. So at this point, I'm wanting to eliminate as many memory reads and lookup tables as possible. I'm working on code to eliminate the raised cosine window 32K lookup table too as I have some DSP code that can calculate a new cosine value in just 3 instructions and that can be vectorized to do 4 at a time. –  Ken Elhardt Mar 21 '12 at 16:17

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