Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What are some good ways to retrieve a specific element in WebDriver/Selenium2 based only on the text inside the element?

<div class="page">
  <ul id="list">
    <li>Apple</li>
    <li>Orange</li>
    <li>Banana</li>
    <li>Grape</li>
  </ul>
</div>

Essentially, I'd like to write something like this to retrieve the specific element:

@driver.find_element(:id, "list").find_element(:text, "Orange")

This is very similar to how I would use a selector when finding text inside a link (i.e. :link_text or :partial_link_text), but I would like to find elements by text inside normal, non-link elements.

Any suggestions? How do you deal with this issue? (In case you were wondering, I am using Ruby.)

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A couple years late, but I was just going to ask this question and answer it so other could find it...

I used a css selector to get all the li elements and then filtered the array based on the text:

@driver.find_elements(css: '#list > li').select {|el| el.text == 'Orange'}.first

You could then .click or .send_keys :return to select the option.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You could do that with xPath. Something like this for your example:

@driver.find_element(:id, "list").find_element(:xpath, './/*[contains(., "Orange")]')
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Would prefer not to use xpath at all, but still, thanks for the great response! –  bbbco Mar 20 '12 at 21:09
    
Didn't know you could chain find_element, I'm assuming that it only searches the child elements of the first element... nice. ;) –  erroric May 15 at 20:22
    
Yeah, calling find_element on the driver starts at the root, while calling it on an element starts from that element. I think that the XPath could override that (so if the '.' wasn't at the start of the XPath, it might still start from the document root as directed by the //), but I don't remember for sure right now. –  Andy Tinkham May 16 at 4:15
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.