Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

any ways to put into html using css upper or lower indecies like: ¹ or ₁ (I also need latin letters).

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

HTML TAGS: try sup and sub tags,...

Demo

Other Option Using css:

<style type="text/css">
#sup,
#sub {
    height: 0;
    line-height: 1;
    vertical-align: baseline;
    _vertical-align: bottom;
    position: relative;

}

#sup {
bottom: 1ex;
}

sub {
top: .5ex;
}
</style>
share|improve this answer
2  
Ah, beat me by 26 seconds. Also, don't link to www.w3fools.com! –  Elliot Bonneville Mar 20 '12 at 19:46
    
Thanks. I had no ideas how to google it right :) –  Ockonal Mar 20 '12 at 19:47

Use the <sup> and <sub> tags.

share|improve this answer

Check out this reference about Superscript and Subscript in CSS:

Superscript and Subscript | HTML Dog

share|improve this answer

I'm not quite sure what you want with latin letters or if you know what latin letters are, but the unicodes you can find here http://unicodelookup.com/#latin

In case you mean roman numbers, there is no automatic translation in HTML, except for an ol

share|improve this answer
<style>
.sub, .sup { position: relative; font-size: 80%; }
</style>
...    
<span class=sub>a</span> (subscript)
<span class=sup>a</span> (superscript)

Tune the values as desired. In particular, you may wish to use different classes for different situations, especially depending on the letter that a superscript is attached to. For example, after an uppercase letter like “A,” a superscript should be placed considerably higher.

Why classes and CSS?

Although HTML appears to have just the right markup for this, sup and sub, they have several drawbacks. Their rendering is inconsistent across browsers and often typographically poor: both the vertical placement and the size can inadequate. It might seem easy to fix this in CSS, but it isn’t, due to an odd IE bug with sizing them: it interprets percentages incorrectly. Moreover, sup and sub often create uneven line spacing.

If you intend to use sup and sub, run some tests before starting to use them extensively. Test on a few browsers and with superscripts and subscripts inside text paragraphs (so that you see the line spacing issue).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.