Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an IList Generic I'm trying to figure out and I'm having a hard time finding the correct format to call the IndexOf method in the class Locations : IList.

namespace Ilistprac
{
   class IList2
   {
      static void Main(string[] args)
      {

        string sSite = "test";

        Locations test = new Locations();

        test.Add(sSite)
      }
    }

  public class Location
  {
      public Location()
      {

      }

      private string _site = string.Empty;
      public string Site
      {
        get { return _site; }
        set { _site = value; }
      }
   }


  public class Locations : IList<Location>
  {
    List<Location> _locs = new List<Location>();

    public Locations() { }


    int IList<Location>.IndexOf(Location item)
    {
       return _locs.IndexOf(item);
    }

   public void Add(string sSite)
   {
     Location loc = new Location();
     loc.Site = sSite;
     _locs.Add(loc);
   }
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
There are all kinds of interface members you haven't implemented there - is that the problem? –  Jon Skeet Mar 20 '12 at 19:57
    
There is automatic property backing in C# 4, your Site could be written simply public string Site { get; set; } –  asawyer Mar 20 '12 at 19:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's not entirely clear what your question is. I am assuming from your comment //nothing that your question is one of these:


1:

I implemented IList<Location>.IndexOf(Location) in my Locations class, but I get a compiler error when I try to call the method on an instance of the Locations class.

If this is your question, then you have two options. You could change the implementation from an explicit interface member implementation to an implicit one:

public int IndexOf(Location item)
{
   return _locs.IndexOf(item); 
}

Alternatively, you can access the method through a reference of type IList<Location> rather than a Locations reference:

Locations locations = GetLocations();
Location location = GetLocation();
int index = ((IList<Location>)locations).IndexOf(location);

The first approach is more common and usually less verbose.


2:

I implemented IList<Location>.IndexOf(Location) in my Locations class by delegating the call to the wrapped List<Location> member of that class, but when I call the method, it always returns -1, indicating that the list does not contain the passed location.

If this is your question, it's because you haven't overridden the Equals(object) method in your Location class, and you're trying to find a location like this:

Locations locations = GetLocations();
string site = GetSite();
Location location = new Location { Site = site };
int index = ((IList<Location>)locations).IndexOf(location);

Here, index will always be -1 because IndexOf is testing the location objects using reference equality. You can override Equals if you want to consider two locations to be equal if and only if their Site properties are equal.

If that equality relation is not universally valid for the Location type, however, you shouldn't do that. In that case, you could use linq to find a location whose Site matches the desired value:

Location location = locations.Where(x => x.Site == site).FirstOrDefault;

If you then need the index of the location, simply do this (assuming that locations can't legitimately hold a null value):

Location location = locations.Where(x => x.Site == site).FirstOrDefault;
int index = location == null ? -1 : locations.IndexOf(location);
share|improve this answer
    
Oops good catch with the //nothing comment. Apparantly IList requires all those methods in order to work so I was going through which method the application was using or not. –  nhat Mar 21 '12 at 12:16
    
@nhat Yes, when a type implements an interface, it must implement all of the interfaces members. (Each member may be implemented implicitly or explicitly.) But I am still not sure whether I have understood your question correctly. Have I? –  phoog Mar 21 '12 at 15:13
    
Thanks for your comprehensive explanation, I was reading it over multiple times to understand your explanation better (that's why for the late responses). Yes you covered everything that I was confused about, I really appreciate it! –  nhat Mar 21 '12 at 17:52
    
Just one more question, where did you get GetLocations(); in Locations locations = GetLocations();? –  nhat Mar 21 '12 at 18:23
    
@nhat that's just a placeholder for any logic in your program that produces an instance of the Locations type. Another way to express that would be something like Locations locations = //whatever –  phoog Mar 21 '12 at 18:33

Class members are as private as possible by default, so as you haven't specified anything for the method, it's private.

Make it public, and you can call it from outside the class itself:

public int IndexOf(Location item)
share|improve this answer
    
Yea I tried that since some of the other IList methods was public but I get an error messag, "The modifier 'public' is not valid for this item" –  nhat Mar 21 '12 at 12:17
    
@nhat: I see. The method is an explicit implementation of the interface, which means that you implement it, but it's not part of the public members of the class. I changed it to an implicit implementation, then you can make it public. –  Guffa Mar 21 '12 at 12:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.