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Given a bunch of records (which represent checkins in my app) with a timestamp field, what would be a good way to determine the current streak of consecutive checkins?

In other words, with the checkins sorted by checkin time descending, how many records are there until a user missed a day?

Currently I'm using this technique:

SELECT distinct(uca.created_at::date) as created_at
    FROM user_challenge_activities as uca INNER JOIN user_challenges as uc
    ON user_challenge_id = uc.ID WHERE uc.user_id = #{user.id}
    order by (uca.created_at::date) DESC;

...where I cast the checkin timestamps to a date (to end up with e.g. 2012-03-20), then in code, go through the records and increment a counter until the date between the record and the next record is greater than 1 day.

However, this approach seems clumsy to me, and it seems like the sort of thing that Postgres would excel at.

So is there in fact a better way to accomplish this?

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Define "current" in "current streak of consecutive check-ins". You mean the streak including today? Or just the latest streak? –  Erwin Brandstetter Mar 20 '12 at 21:18
    
Ah yes, current streak of consecutive check-ins including today. Essentially, the number of consecutive days including today that you've checked in –  yalestar Mar 20 '12 at 21:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
with t as (
    SELECT distinct(uca.created_at::date) as created_at
    FROM user_challenge_activities as uca 
    INNER JOIN user_challenges as uc ON user_challenge_id = uc.ID 
    WHERE uc.user_id = #{user.id}
    )
select count(*)
from t
where t.create_at > (
    select d.d
    from generate_series('2010-01-01'::date, CURRENT_DATE, '1 day') d(d)
    left outer join t on t.created_at = d.d::date
    where t.created_at is null
    order by d.d desc
    limit 1
)
share|improve this answer
    
Now that is a little slice of awesome! One question though: what is the significance of the 2010-01-01? –  yalestar Mar 20 '12 at 21:11
1  
I think the CTE needs brackets around it: with t as ( ... ) –  a_horse_with_no_name Mar 20 '12 at 22:11
    
@a_horse_with_no_name Corrected –  Clodoaldo Neto Mar 20 '12 at 22:28

let's try this again. will only generate series for the necessary range:

SELECT count(distinct(uca.created_at::date)) FROM user_challenge_activities as uca
JOIN 
  (SELECT generate_series(max(series_date), 
                         (select max(user_challenge_activities.created_at) 
                          FROM user_challenge_activities), '1 day') as datez 
   FROM 
     (SELECT generate_series(min(user_challenge_activities.created_at::date),
                             max(user_challenge_activities.created_at), '1 day')::date
             as series_date 
      FROM user_challenge_activities) x
   LEFT JOIN user_challenge_activities 
     ON (user_challenge_activities.created_at::date = x.series_date)
   WHERE created_at IS NULL) d ON d.datez = uca.created_at::date
 INNER JOIN user_challenges as uc ON user_challenge_id = uc.ID 
 WHERE uc.user_id = #{user.id};
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