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I think I'm missing something on the set terminology.

The following code works fine for sorting a vector:

using boost::bind;
std::vector<SegPoly> result;
//...
std::sort(result.begin(),result.end(),bind(std::less<double>(),bind(&SegPoly::getLength,_1), bind(&SegPoly::getLength,_2)));

but I cannot use such a sorting criterion for a std::set

 using boost::bind;
  std::set<SegPoly> polySet(inPolys.begin(),inPolys.end(),bind(std::less<double>(),bind(&SegPoly::getLength,_1), bind(&SegPoly::getLength,_2)));

This gives a cryptic compile error beyond my capabilities:

no matching function for call to 'std::set, std::allocator >::set(__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator > >, __gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator > >, boost::_bi::bind_t, boost::_bi::list2, boost::_bi::list1 > >, boost::_bi::bind_t, boost::_bi::list1 > > > >)'

Anyone any idea where the bug is ?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

bind returns a function, which is the static type that you would need to do your strict weak ordering on.

typedef std::set<foo, boost::function<bool(const foo &, const foo &)> > foos_t;

Then you can set the function at runtime with bind. Here is a complete example.

TEST(strict_weak) {
    struct foo {
        int a;
        int b;
        static bool with_a(const foo &lhs, const foo &rhs) {
            return lhs.a < rhs.a;
        }
        static bool with_b(const foo &lhs, const foo &rhs) {
            return lhs.b < rhs.b;
        }
    };
    typedef std::set<foo, boost::function<bool(const foo &, const foo &)> > foos_t;
    {{ // scope
        foos_t foos(boost::bind(foo::with_a, _1, _2));
        foo p; p.a = 4; p.b = 1;
        foo q; q.a = 2; q.b = 5;
        foos.insert(p);
        foos.insert(q);
        for (const foo &e : foos)
            cout << "with_a " << e.a << ", " << e.b << endl;
    }}
    {{ // scope
        foos_t foos(boost::bind(foo::with_b, _1, _2));
        foo p; p.a = 4; p.b = 1;
        foo q; q.a = 2; q.b = 5;
        foos.insert(p);
        foos.insert(q);
        for (const foo &e : foos)
            cout << "with_b " << e.a << ", " << e.b << endl;
  }}
}

Output:

with_a 2, 5
with_a 4, 1
with_b 4, 1
with_b 2, 5
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for the neat code !! – Martin Mar 20 '12 at 22:52
1  
While this is neat and works, it might be overkill to use something as expensive as boost::function, when a simple free function would have done the trick. – Kerrek SB Mar 20 '12 at 22:54
    
@KerrekSB: How do you accomplish that with a free function and not with a functor as Xeo pointed out. ? Why is boost::function expensive compared to a functor ? – Martin Mar 20 '12 at 22:58
1  
@Martin: Wouldn't std::set<foo, bool(*)(foo const &, foo const &)> x(&f1); do, with bool f1(foo const & lhs, foo const & rhs) { return lhs.a < rhs.a; } do? boost::function takes a while to explain. – Kerrek SB Mar 20 '12 at 23:05
    
@KerrekSB: True! I did not know that set takes a function pointer as well. All examples I have seen so far were with functors. Thanks. Actually I create this set only once, so the memory usage of boost function is negligible but why use boost if plain stl works well – Martin Mar 20 '12 at 23:24

There's no bug. You need to specify the comparision function / functor when creating a std::set, it's part of the type. Now, the type of boost::bind is unspecified, since depending on the arguments, it can create a multitude of types.

A solution might be to use boost::function:

typedef std::set<SegPoly, boost::function<bool(unsigned, unsigned)> > set_type;
set_type s(inPolys.begin(), inPolys.end(),
    boost::bind(std::less<double>(),boost::bind(&SegPoly::getLength,_1), boost::bind(&SegPoly::getLength,_2)));

A way better and most likely more performant option is creating your own comparator:

struct SegPolyComp{
  bool operator()(SegPoly const& lhs, SegPoly const& rhs) const{
    return lhs.getLength() < rhs.getLength();
  }
}

std::set<SegPoly, SegPolyComp> s(inSegPoly.begin(), inSegPoly.end());
share|improve this answer
    
You have a point with the second option. I was just getting my head around boost::bind and tried this one as example. – Martin Mar 20 '12 at 22:54

As already noted (a number of times by now) you need to pass the type of the comparator object as a template argument, then pass an instance of that type as the parameter. Trying to do it with Boost bind would be...ugly, IMO. If you have C++11 available, you might consider a lambda instead:

auto pred = [](SegPoly const &left, SegPoly const &right) { 
    return left.getLength() < right.getLength(); 
};

std::set<SegPoly, decltype(pred)> 
    polySet(inPolys.begin(),inPolys.end(), pred);
share|improve this answer
    
I wish I could use c+11, its just like the unreachable carrot dangling in front of the mule :-\ – Martin Mar 20 '12 at 22:56

The comparator is part of the type of the set. You cannot just pass anything as the second argument. If you want to pass the result of bind, you will probably want to make your comparator a function<bool (T,T)> and then pass the binder during construction.

I have never actually done it, so I cannot tell you more than that. Good luck :)

As of the error message, it is telling you that in your set, there is no constructor that takes the result of bind as the comparator argument.

share|improve this answer

std::set is declared as template < class Key, class Compare = less<Key>, class Allocator = allocator<Key> > class set. By writing std::set<SegPoly> you are forcing set to use the default comparator, which is std::less<SegPoly>, not your custom-made one. You have pass the whole type of the boost monstrosity as the template parameter to std::set.

share|improve this answer

A std::set is not a sequence container; rather, it is an associative container. Sorting only makes sense for sequence containers in which the elements appear in some fixed ordering (namely the order in which they were added).

You may be delighted to know, however, that iterating over an std::set is guaranteed to visit the elements in increasing order of the element with respect to the ordering you specified when you defined the set type (defaulting to std::less<T>). You cannot impart any other ordering on the set iteration. You can however provide your own comparison functor when you create the set type; just be aware that the comparison defines what the set means by "equality".

share|improve this answer
    
"You can however provide your own comparison functor when you create the set type; just be aware that the comparison defines what the set means by "equality"." Thats exactly what I want to do, I just took the wrong template flavor as Tom Kerr pointed out – Martin Mar 20 '12 at 22:51

You cannot construct std::set like that because you need to specify Comparator functor type as template parameter, in addition to the functor itself as a constructor arg.

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