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I'd like to run statements like

SELECT date_add('2008-12-31', 1) FROM DUAL

Does Hive (running on Amazon EMR) have something similar?

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Most databases do not need a pseudotable like DUAL, thats Oracle only. So whats your real question, do you want to do date arithmetics? – schlenk Mar 21 '12 at 2:39
    
@schlenk I just want something to run functions and do debugging from, since I'm not very familiar with the language. – jawonbreed Mar 21 '12 at 21:32

There is a nice working solution (well, workaround) available in the link, but it is slow as you might imagine.

The idea is that you create a table with a dummy field, create a text file whose content is just 'X', load that text into that table. Viola.

CREATE TABLE dual (dummy STRING);

load data local inpath '/path/to/textfile/dual.txt' overwrite into table dual;

SELECT date_add('2008-12-31', 1) from dual;
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Best solution is not to mention table name.

select 1+1;

Gives the result 2. But poor Hive need to spawn map reduce to find this!

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Not yet: hive> select 1 + 1; FAILED: ParseException line 1:14 mismatched input '<EOF>' expecting FROM near '1' in from clause – teu Jun 1 '15 at 20:13
1  
Old post but worth mentioning that this is supported in at least version 0.13 – Aaron Jun 4 '15 at 15:20

To create a dual like table in hive where there is one column and one row you can do the following:

create table dual (x int);
insert into table dual select count(*)+1 as x from dual;

Test an expression:

select split('3,2,1','\\,') as my_new_array from dual;

Output:

["3","2","1"]
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