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I am trying to build a calculator in C#. Now I would like to know whether it is possible to do a calculation, which is inside a textfield. For example a user enters into a textfield (2*3)+6. Now how would I tell my script to calculate this and then output the result?

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marked as duplicate by nawfal, krlmlr, George Duckett, soon, A.H. Jun 1 '13 at 13:36

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
If you want to create your own solution from scratch, then look up "Reverse polish notation" – Chris Laplante Mar 20 '12 at 22:14
1  
Shunting yard algorithm seems to be pretty common aswell: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shunting-yard_algorithm – Jaakko Lipsanen Mar 20 '12 at 22:15
    
There are about a dozen duplicate question on SO. 1 2 3 – CodesInChaos Mar 20 '12 at 22:32
up vote 14 down vote accepted

You could use the Compute method:

using System;
using System.Data;

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        var result = new DataTable().Compute("(2*3)+6", null);
        Console.WriteLine(result);
    }
}

prints:

12

Of course don't expect to be able to calculate any complex functions with this method. You are limited to basic arithmetic.

And if you wanted to handle more complex expressions you could use CodeDOM.

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3  
+1 I didn't know that – Robbie Mar 20 '12 at 22:16
3  
This will work but is in no way what the DataTable is designed for. – Dave S Mar 20 '12 at 22:17
1  
+1: Blog-worthy – Chris Laplante Mar 20 '12 at 22:20
1  
@phpheini just implement the Shunting yard algorithm. This is what your teacher expects and this is how you will learn the most from the assignment. This answer is kind of a troll answer. Still it is remarkably cool, a sort of internal developer humor. – Stilgar Mar 20 '12 at 22:49
1  
Are you prepared to argue with your teacher over the definition of the question? I am sure Darin is but are you? :) Also he can easily expand the question by adding a single operator not supported by the compute method. This will weed out trick solutions like this but will be really easy to add to the real solutions. – Stilgar Mar 20 '12 at 23:00

You can use the System.Linq.Dynamic library to do this:

`

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        const string exp = "(A*B) + C";

        var p0 = Expression.Parameter(typeof(int), "A");
        var p1 = Expression.Parameter(typeof(int), "B");
        var p2 = Expression.Parameter(typeof(int), "C");

        var e = System.Linq.Dynamic.DynamicExpression.ParseLambda(new[] { p0, p1, p2 }, typeof(int), exp);

        var result = e.Compile().DynamicInvoke(2, 3, 6);

        Console.WriteLine(result);
        Console.ReadKey();
    }

`

You can download a copy of it here.

N.B. the string could've just been "(2 * 3) + 6", but this method has the bonus that you can pass in values to the equation too.

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