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I have a question about the static keyword in C++. I realize that it retains the value after exacting out of the scope (but comes in accessible), but I have a few questions.

  1. When people say it is inaccessible outside of the scope, it just means that you cannot alter the value (it will error) outside of it's identifying scope?

  2. I was thinking about this code:

    #include "iostream"
    
    void staticExample();
    
    int main()
    {
        staticExample();
    
        return 0;
    }
    
    void staticExample()
    {
        for (int i = 1; i <= 10; ++i)
        {
            static int number = 1;
            std::cout << number << "\n";
    
            ++number;
        }
    }
    

and I thought to myself, that in every iteration of the loop, I am setting the 'number' variable to 1. As I first expected though, it printed 1, 2, 3.. 10. Does the compiler recognize that that line setting as 1 was a declaration and ignores it's "change"?

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Strictly speaking you can still access it as long as you have aliased it via a pointer or reference. –  0xC0000022L Mar 20 '12 at 22:17
    
@STATUS_ACCESS_DENIED, other than having a pointer holding its address, it cannot be accessed? –  ZERO Mar 20 '12 at 22:20
    
there are probably half a dozen hackery ways to still do it, but within the scope of the language itself I think those would be the only ones. Read up on "aliasing" ... it is the cause of its own class of errors :) –  0xC0000022L Mar 20 '12 at 22:23
    
@STATUS_ACCESS_DENIED Thanks, now for my second question, the compiler just ignores the initialization line (if already initialized) and continues on with the code? –  ZERO Mar 20 '12 at 22:27
    
no, the initialization will typically happen before your main() gets to run. It depends on the compiler. Another possibility is that the value is stored in the executable initialized already. It really depends. But it won't be ignored. However, it will get initialized only once and if you change the value after that, it will be a persistent change. –  0xC0000022L Mar 20 '12 at 22:29
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The object comes to life once and so it is initialized once. Initialization is not assignment. (IINA? いい、な!)

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So it ignores the initialization and continues on to the rest of the code? –  ZERO Mar 20 '12 at 22:19
    
@ZERO Yeah, same as if the loop wasn't there but you called the method more than once. –  jli Mar 20 '12 at 22:38
    
This answer is IMO misleading. And @ZERO: no the initialization does not get ignored. It happens simply once and any subsequent run through the scope will ignore the initialization. It's specific to static variables. –  0xC0000022L Mar 20 '12 at 22:38
    
@STATUS_ACCESS_DENIED Yeah, I figured that out after you told me in your answer up there. –  ZERO Mar 20 '12 at 22:42
    
In C++, a block-scope static is initialized on the first execution of that block. In C, before program startup. So in C++ the second and subsequent executions of the block have to skip that action. Initialiation can only be done once which is why it is initialization! If it was done more than once, it would not be initialization, but assignment. In C, there is no initialization to skip; the object is already initialized before the block is executed. –  Kaz Mar 20 '12 at 22:56
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Call staticExample twice and see what happens to your output. This will help you understand 'static storage' as it applies to local variables.

#include <iostream> 

void staticExample()
{
    static int number = 1;

    for (int i = 1; i <= 10; ++i)
    {
        std::cout << number << "\n";
        ++number;
    }
}

int main()
{
    staticExample();  // begins counting at 1
    staticExample();  // begins counting at 10

    return 0;
}

Output:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

I read a quote once that I liked, "You have stack storage and you have heap storage, but you also have another type of storage. It's called static and it's neither on the stack or in the heap." Not verbatim, but something similar to that.

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A static variable (this also is valid for static class members) gets initialized only once - globally. Even the first run through the scope that declares the initialization will usually ignore the initialization, though there may be some compiler out there that does it differently - so it's compiler-dependent.

The reason: the initialization usually happens before your main() function gets called and often will even be reflected in the executable/binary itself in that static data gets written there pre-initialized at link-time. This means that static data most of the time will be valid even before the first piece of code (the parts of the C runtime that will call your main()) gets to run.

Other than pointer/reference aliasing there would not be a way to access such a variable outside its immediate scope (the surrounding braces {}), though.

From here:

6.7 Declaration statement

An implementation is permitted to perform early initialization of other block-scope variables with static or thread storage duration under the same conditions that an implementation is permitted to statically initialize a variable with static or thread storage duration in namespace scope (3.6.2).

Most implementations I have encountered during reverse-engineering appear to make use of this, in particular because the following also applies:

3.7.1 Static storage duration

If a variable with static storage duration has initialization or a destructor with side effects, it shall not be eliminated even if it appears to be unused, except that a class object or its copy/move may be eliminated as specified in 12.8.

... which means it makes sense to have static behave similar to the way it did in C - i.e. initialize its contents up-front if the initialization was defined at compile-time.

Many compilers will otherwise initialize with zero or some magic number (for example in debug builds) when the variable was declared but not initialized at declaration-time.

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The standard says that static variables should be initialized the first time they get in scope. However it does allow the variable to be initialized just as a global variable if it doesn't make a difference. –  slartibartfast Mar 20 '12 at 22:49
    
@myrkos: I am aware of that and was describing the most common way this is done in order to explain how and why it works. I don't see how your comment invalidates what I wrote, though? Any pointers would be appreciated. –  0xC0000022L Mar 20 '12 at 22:51
    
int * a; double * b; Just kidding :P. It just seems you're saying static variables are initialized just as global variables, while that's just an allowed optimization and what really is supposed to happen is that they get initialized once they get in scope. Just to be totally correct. –  slartibartfast Mar 20 '12 at 22:55
    
@myrkos: amended with a rationale for why I described it the way that I described it. I'm a reverse-engineer and as such see often the implementation details when others only read the standard documents. –  0xC0000022L Mar 20 '12 at 23:28
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  1. It just means that code like this will result in a compiler error message:

    {
        static int x;
        x = 5;
    }
    x = 6;  // Compiler error here!  We're outside the scope that x was declared in.
    

    But that doesn't mean you can't access it. For example:

    int *p = NULL;
    {
        static int x;
        x = 5;
        p = &x;
    }
    *p = 6;  // This is fine
    
  2. A static variable is only initialised once; the first time it's reached.

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So it just skips over the initialization line and continues? –  ZERO Mar 20 '12 at 22:22
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When people say it is inaccessible outside of the scope, it just means that you cannot alter the value (it will error) outside of it's identifying scope?

No, that's not what scope means. When you use a name "outside of the scope" of something it means that that name won't resolve to the entity named inside the scope in question. The name might resolve to a different object or it might be an invalid name depending on the context.

So long as the object's lifetime has begun and hasn't ended the object could be altered by an expression outside of the scope of its variable by various means such as it's address being passed to another function where it is stored and subsequently this stored address is used to alter the object.

In your code example = 1 is an initializer, not an assignment. It is used when the variable is initialized which, as the object is declared static, happens only the first time execution passes through the declaration statement.

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