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Why can't open generic types be passed as parameters. I frequently have classes like:

public class Example<T> where T: BaseClass
{
   public int a {get; set;}
   public List<T> mylist {get; set;}
}

Lets say BaseClass is as follows;

public BaseClass
{
    public int num;
}

I then want a method of say:

public int MyArbitarySumMethod(Example example)//This won't compile Example not closed
{
   int sum = 0;
   foreach(BaseClass i in example.myList)//myList being infered as an IEnumerable
       sum += i.num;
   sum = sum * example.a;
   return sum;
}

I then have to write an interface just to pass this one class as a parameter as follows:

public interface IExample
{
public int a {get; set;}
public IEnumerable<BaseClass> myIEnum {get;}
}

The generic class then has to be modified to:

public class Example<T>: IExample where T: BaseClass
{
   public int a {get; set;}
   public List<T> mylist {get; set;}
   public IEnumerable<BaseClass> myIEnum {get {return myList;} }
}

That's a lot of ceremony for what I would have thought the compiler could infer. Even if something can't be changed I find it psychologically very helpful if I know the reasons / justifications for the absence of Syntax short cuts.

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3  
It's not really clear what restriction you're talking about, as you haven't shown how you're trying to pass it. I suspect I have an idea what you mean, but the question isn't clear... –  Jon Skeet Mar 20 '12 at 22:48
    
What do you mean when you ask "[how to] open a generic type"? –  Ed S. Mar 20 '12 at 22:48
    
@Rich, how would you syntactically pass Example<T> (even in principle) if T remained unspecified? –  Kirk Woll Mar 20 '12 at 22:52
    
@JonSkeet,@Kirk Woll, hopefully the edits have clarified this. –  Rich Oliver Mar 20 '12 at 23:06
    
You can modify MyArbitrarySumMethod to MyArbitarySumMethod<T>(Example<T> example) where T : BaseClass. However, the caller still needs to know the type. –  Porges Mar 20 '12 at 23:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I have been in similar situation, but I never had this (very good!) question. Now that I am forced to think about it, here is my answer:

You expect the following to work:

void F(Example<> e) {
   Console.WriteLine(e.a); //could work
}

Yeah, this could theoretically work, but this won't:

void F(Example<> e) {
   Console.WriteLine(e.mylist); //?? type unknown
}

You expect the compiler and CLR to be able to analyze method bodies and proove that really no unsafe access is possible in the first case. That could be made to work. Why wasn't it? Probably, the design is not really sound and confusing. Also, "all features are unimplemented by default. Somebody must implement, test and document them."

Edit: I want to point out that this feature cannot be implemented without cooperation from the CLR. The C# compiler must emit the exact method to be called which is not possible on an open generic type. The type system does not even allow such a variable right now.

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1  
Indeed all features are unimplemented by default, but I use generics a lot and I repeatedly find myself typing out the same pattern over and over. I'm surprised that others have not felt a strong need for this feature. Closing a type is in essence a form of inheritance. –  Rich Oliver Mar 20 '12 at 23:15
    
My experience tells me that this happens sometimes, but seldomly. Surely, this entirely depends on the project. But my main point really is that this feature is probably confusing ("why can I access a but not mylist?" "why does this work but not that?") and that it is probably not easy to find a good solution that works in absolutely all cases. –  usr Mar 20 '12 at 23:18
    
Maybe I don't write typical C# code. I must confess in the dark hours of the night, the thoughts Smalltalk and Lisp have crossed my mind. –  Rich Oliver Mar 20 '12 at 23:34
1  
@Rich, speaking for myself, I'm persoanlly very pleased that C# eschewed this feature -- the consequences of not doing so can be seen in Java's implementation of wildcard matching (MyClass<? extends Foo>) -- it's frankly hideous. I personally don't mind defining the interfaces you describe to handle the non-generic situations (i.e. IList) as I find it gives me exactly the control I desire for such circumstances. –  Kirk Woll Mar 21 '12 at 2:25
1  
@RichOliver, I agree with you 100%. I happens to me over and over and I wonder why this does not seem trivial to the designers of CLR and c#. In my current project I make heavy use of generics and the existence of this tiny feature could wipe off most of my typeof(...).GetMethod(...).MakeGenricMethod(...).Invoke(...) as .... that happens countless times in my code. –  Alireza Apr 8 '12 at 8:56

One implementation rationale: supporting this would require that all non-private generic class methods be made virtual, as otherwise there would be no way to know which specific method to call for an 'open' generic type. There are different jittings of the different closed-type methods, with different corresponding method pointers. Defining an interface manually corresponds to instructing the compiler which methods must be treated as virtual and also allows you to specify exactly which subset of the 'open' functionality you want to expose. What you're proposing is basically that all generic classes have an interface class implicitly generated for the 'open' portion of their public interface, which has performance implications for the class even if this feature is never used.

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Actually, the situation is worse than that. If a Foo<T> has e.g. a static field Bar of type int, Foo<int>.Bar, Foo<long>.Bar, Foo<string>.Bar, Foo<Point>.Bar, etc. would all refer to different storage locations which could have different values. To which of them would Foo<>.Bar refer? Since there's no way general way that a compiler calling some member on some Foo<T> would be able to tell whether that member might directly or indirectly access Foo<T>.Bar, it would have no way to know whether any attempt to call Foo<> without a parameter could possibly be safe. –  supercat Jul 25 '12 at 19:45

Maybe I'm not understanding your exact question, but you can make your "MyArbitrarySumMethod" take an arbitrary Example by declaring it like this:

public int MyArbitarySumMethod<T>(Example<T> example) where T : BaseClass

You can then call it without specifying "T":

int sum = MyArbitrarySumMethod(myExampleInstance);

Is that what you're looking for?

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@KirkWoll: No, I don't think so. This approach is exactly the one I was going to suggest. –  Jon Skeet Mar 21 '12 at 6:46
    
@Jon, I suppose you're right. It had seemed to me the OP was looking for a general way to pass a generic type around without having a reference to T -- where the general solution is to write an interface-wrapper for it. But for the specific use-case of a method, you're right that this will work. –  Kirk Woll Mar 21 '12 at 14:18

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