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I've been trying to figure out how to add an array into a struct... a struct of ints for example would look like this:

struct test{
    int a;
    int b;
    int c;
} test = {0,1,2};

but if I want to have an array for example:

struct test{
    int a;
    int b;
    int c;
    int deck[52];
} test;

is this doable? the initialization of the deck (of cards) happens in a different function. when I do it like this, I don't get an error in the struct but I get it when I try to use it... for example if I do this test.deck[i] = 1; it gives me this error:

Error C2143 Syntax Error missing ';' before '.'

if I were to use a , I could write test.a = 1;

Could anyone write a simple struct where a variable in it is an array and then just use it for a simple command?

share|improve this question
    
Please show a complete example of the failing code. – Benjamin Lindley Mar 20 '12 at 23:10
5  
Why are you giving your variable the same identifier as it's type? – AusCBloke Mar 20 '12 at 23:11
1  
Yes, that is completely doable. I'm not sure why it's causing problems for you. Perhaps you can post more code. – Jonathan Wood Mar 20 '12 at 23:11
    
The big problem I am having with posting the code is that for this problem to make sense I'd have to put a whole lot of code up here... that's why I asked if someone can just write an extremely basic example of initialization and usage, so I can compare – Gal Appelbaum Mar 20 '12 at 23:13
1  
It works fine for me too, post a small example where the code fails and also try changing the name of your variable. – AusCBloke Mar 20 '12 at 23:15

The error:

Error C2143 Syntax Error missing ';' before '.'

is due to test being a type name. You need to define an instance:

int main() {
   test mytest;
   mytest.deck[1] = 1;
   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Is that a visual studio thing? It works fine for me here. – Carl Norum Mar 20 '12 at 23:13
    
He did create an instance. It just happened to have the same name as the type, which was silly. – Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 20 '12 at 23:18

If this is C++, no C, drop the test after the struct definition.

The following code works perfectly.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

struct Test {
  int a;
  int b;
  int c;
  int deck[52];
};

int main (int argc, char* argv[])
{
    Test t;
    t.deck[1] = 1;
    cout << "t.deck[1]: "<< t.deck[1] << endl;
    exit(0);
}

The problem: In C, you put the test after the definition to create a variable named test. So in C, test is not a type, it is a global variable, the way you wrote that.

This compiles:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

struct Test {
  int a;
  int b;
  int c;
  int deck[52];
} test;

int main (int argc, char* argv[])
{
    test.deck[1] = 1;
    cout << "test.deck[1]: "<< test.deck[1] << endl;
    exit(0);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your second example is exactly what the OP has in the question, isn't it? – Carl Norum Mar 20 '12 at 23:23
    
The OP didn't post the code in which he uses the struct. And that, I think, may be wrong. Has he declared i before trying to index the vector? Well, he asked for an example of a code that would compile, I gave it to him. – Castilho Mar 20 '12 at 23:26

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