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Working with C#, ASP.NET, MVC, WCF, assume you have a non-public business logic service layer, and for security and other such reasons you have a gateway or facade layer that is exposing the same operations publicly.

Therefore, you have two tiers with essentially identical data transfer (request/repsonse) objects, except the public/exposed service tier needs to deal with a GUID representing the calling user, and the private/internal service tier needs to deal with a richer authentication ticket. This authentication ticket must not be exposed to the public tier.

PublicDto {
      Guid userGuid;
      string property1;
      ...
      string propertyN;
 }

PrivateDto {
      AuthenticationTicket authTicket;
      string property1;
      ...
      string propertyN;
 }

Is there an efficient way to derive a base class or utilize interfaces here in such a way as to shield the private AuthenticationTicket from the public tier but minimize the cutting and pasting of the differentiating properties between private and public DTOs?

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Why not a BaseDto with all the common properties, then two derived classes, one PublicDto with userGuid, and one PrivateDto with authTicket? –  Diego Mar 20 '12 at 23:19
    
There are dozens of DTOs, so this results in dozens*3 classes to represent them. –  andrewbadera Mar 20 '12 at 23:28

2 Answers 2

Derive both from a common base class declaring only the common properties

public abstract class BaseDto {
    string property1;
    ...
    string propertyN;
} 

public class PublicDto : BaseDto {
      Guid userGuid;
}

private class PrivateDto : BaseDto {
      AuthenticationTicket authTicket;
}

UPDATE:

A completely different approach is to treat the properties in a generic way, if this is a feasible way because of serialization.

public class PublicDto {
      public Guid userGuid { get; set; }
      public Dictionary<string,string> Prop { get; }

      public PublicDto ()
      {
          Prop = new Dictionary<string,string>();
      }
}

Usage

dto = new PublicDto();
Prop["FirstName"] = "John";
Prop["LastName"] = "Doe";

UPDATE #2

1

You could just derive the private from the public dto. The Guid would remain unused in the private dto.

2

Generic solution

public class Dto<T> {
    public T ID { get; set; }

    string property1;
    ...
    string propertyN;
} 

var publicDto = new Dto<Guid>();
var privateDto = new Dto<AuthenticationTicket>();
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There are dozens of DTOs, so this results in dozens*3 classes to represent them. Which I guess is not to say this is NOT the most efficient way to do it, but I was hoping there was something slicker/more efficient. –  andrewbadera Mar 20 '12 at 23:28
    
hrmmmmm that's an interesting thought, let me ponder that, thanks. –  andrewbadera Mar 20 '12 at 23:36
    
only downside I see right off is the fact that the private tier already utilizes the existing DTOs, so this still results in a lot of rewrite. the need here is to extend to the public tier while shielding the internal auth implementation. –  andrewbadera Mar 20 '12 at 23:38
    
would make validation burdensome too ... –  andrewbadera Mar 20 '12 at 23:38
    
purely generic might work well. wonder what the WSDL would end up looking like. investigating this and the interface option from IDisposable. –  andrewbadera Mar 20 '12 at 23:57

You could make a few interfaces and one set of DTOs, then just make sure that the correct interface is what you pass around.

public interface IAnyPublic { Guid user; }
public interface IAnyPrivate { AuthenticationTicket ticket; }
public interface IOneBase { int foo; string goo; }
public interface IOnePublic : IOneBase, IAnyPublic { } // nothing to add, sir!
public interface IOnePrivate : IOneBase, IAnyPrivate { } // nothing to add, sir!
public class OneBase : IOnePublic, IOnePrivate { /*implement*/ }

Now all you do is make sure your internal stuff is passing around IOnePrivate ( IAnyPrivate) if it needs the ticket (only the ticket). Likewise, the public stuff is passing around IOnePublic (IAnyPublic) if it needs the user (only the user). Finally, the methods defined in terms of only the base only use IOneBase.

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thanks Marc, this was something I had discussed with the person I'm working with on this as well, though not quite fully baked like this. this might work well. –  andrewbadera Mar 20 '12 at 23:45
    
and if you want to use existing DTOs, that's just one more thing to list in the OneBase inheritance chain (or you could play the partial class game to mix-in the stuff you want). –  IDisposable Mar 20 '12 at 23:45
    
On other thing to consider, is exposing the Guid or AuthenticationTicket what you really need to do, or are you exposing some other slightly-more abstract interface that knows what to do with the underlying information? –  IDisposable Mar 20 '12 at 23:59

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