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I'm studing STL, then i thought "i'll make a 2d array!" but whatever...

a coded this:

vector< vector<int> > vetor;

vetor.resize(10);
vetor[0].resize(10);

for(int i = 0; i < vetor.capacity(); i++){
    for(int h = 0; h < vetor[0].capacity();h++){
        vetor[i][h] = h;
    }

}

Until here, ok. But when i try to show the array value a use this:

for(int i = 0; i < vetor.capacity(); i++){
    cout << "LINE " << i << ": ";
    for(int h = 0; h < vetor[0].capacity();h++){
        cout << vetor[i][h] <<" ";
    }
    cout << "\n";
}

And the results are really wrong:

LINE 0: 4 5 6 7 8 9 6 7 8 9
LINE 1: 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 0 1
LINE 2: 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 0 1
LINE 3: 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 0 1
LINE 4: 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 0 1
LINE 5: 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 0 1
LINE 6: 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 0 1
LINE 7: 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 0 1
LINE 8: 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 4 5
LINE 9: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

What's happening with my program? it isn't printing the right values!

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Several issues:

You are only resizing the first vector. You need to resize all of them.

Instead consider using this:

vector< vector<int> > vetor (10, vector<int>(10, 0));

this will create a 10 x 10 vector of vectors.

vector has a constructor (size_t size, T default_value) which constructs the vector with size elements of value default_value.

If the size of the vector is known at compiletime and is not going to change you can also use a std::array instead for a slight performance gain.

Secondly use vector::size() not vector::capacity() to determine the size of a vector (capacity refers to the backing store, and can be largely ignored except for optimization)

for(int i = 0; i < vetor.size(); i++){
    for(int h = 0; h < vetor[0].size(); h++){
        vetor[i][h] = h;
    }
}

When you resize vetor[0].resize(10) you are only resizing the first element.

You would need to:

vetor[0].resize(10)
vetor[1].resize(10)
vetor[2].resize(10)
.
.
vetor[10].resize(10)

to do what you want to do.

(Put another way each vector in the vector of vectors has a potentially different size. It is not a matrix class.)

share|improve this answer
    
In addition to this, he needs to count up to size(), not capacity(), even though in this instance, they will probably be the same. – Benjamin Lindley Mar 20 '12 at 23:22
    
or better yet: std::array<10, std::array<10, int>> – Mooing Duck Mar 20 '12 at 23:23
    
but what i'm doing when resizing vetor.resize(x) and vetor[0].resize(y)? where i can see a visible example? – Petris Rodrigo Fernandes Mar 20 '12 at 23:24
    
@PetrisRodrigoFernandes: I edited my answer to answer this. Let me know if you need more. – Andrew Tomazos Mar 20 '12 at 23:29
    
With a vector of vectors can i have vectors of different sizes? – Petris Rodrigo Fernandes Mar 20 '12 at 23:36

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