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There have been some users of our service who claim that when they are accessing their accounts (logging in with their username and password, we then store a client-side cookie to keep the state) on their corporate LAN, their accounts get switched to one another on different PCs.

Forexample:

  1. User1 logs in on PC1
  2. User2 logs in on PC2
  3. User2's browser shows User1 being logged in

I guess this may have something to do with their Proxy settings? So how to approach debugging this?

Two separate groups have reported this, so I suspect there may be something wrong with our app although we have not done any customization to the CakePHP core.

Some app parameters:

  • CakePHP low security setting
  • PHP 5.2
  • Sessions stored in a DB
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Did you ever managed to solve this issue? I am facing the same thing. –  Bart Van Remortele Oct 31 '13 at 14:46
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1 Answer

Weird. Typically the server sends a cookie to the user, which has a session id. This session id is then used to determine which user belongs to which session. This leaves no room for what you describe above.

The only possibilities I can imagine are,

Your app bypasses the standard PHP session handling and uses like ip addresses or something as session id's, which would be very dumb, but we've all seen worse I'm sure.

or

The user's browsers all store their cookies in the same place on network storage, like some sort of dumb client setup with multiple users, which would be ridiculous, because your site would not be the only one with issues.

There may be other possibilities, but they are hard to think up at the moment.

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another possibility is if you app is set up to send session ids via url, and one user is passing a link to another user... allowing the passing of session id's via url should be turned off in your PHP settings since it is a security hazard. –  dqhendricks Mar 21 '12 at 1:26
    
Well, none of the mentioned possibilities are happening. No matter how I try to think about this, I pretty much get to the same conclusion and that is they may be running some sort of remote access where two computers can access the same profile/network storage, which would invalidate the first logged user's session and cause the session switching on both physical PCs. Though, exactly as you say, they would notice the same problem with other sites where login is required. –  Miro Solanka Mar 21 '12 at 15:54
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