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I'm reading a book on scala programming (the Programming in Scala), and I've got a question about the yield syntax.

According to the book, the syntax for yield can be expressed like: for clauses yield body

but when I try to run the script below, the compiler complains about too many arguments for getName

def scalaFiles = 
  for (
    file <- filesHere
    if file.isFile
    if file.getName.endsWith(".scala")
  ) yield file.getName {
    // isn't this supposed to be the body part?
  }

so, my question is what is the "body" part of the yield syntax, how to use it?

share|improve this question
up vote 15 down vote accepted

Shortly, any expression (even that that return Unit), but you must enclose that expression into the brackets or just drop them down (works only with a single statement expressions):

def scalaFiles = 
  for (
    file <- filesHere
    if file.isFile
    if file.getName.endsWith(".scala")
  ) yield {
    // here is expression
  }

code above will work (but with no sense):

scalaFiles: Array[Unit]

Next option is:

for(...) yield file.getName

and as a tip, you can rewrite your for comprehension like that:

def scalaFiles = 
      for (
        file <- filesHere;
        if file.isFile;
        name = file.getName;
        if name.endsWith(".scala")
      ) yield {
        name
      }
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, I got it! Thank for your answer! – Void Main Mar 21 '12 at 0:38

You may like to try this from the lovely post by Zach Cox

def files(rootDir: File)(process: File => Unit) { for (dir <- rootDir.listFiles; if dir.isDirectory) { for (file <- dir.listFiles; if file.isFile) { process(file) } } }

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