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If i have a method which takes in one byte of Red, one byte of Green and one byte of Blue, and i know that from each byte if i extract the last 3 bits in the red byte, last 2 bits in the green byte and the last 3 bits in the blue byte, how would i accomplish this? I was using the code below, but it's not entirely working. What am i doing wrong here?

    private const byte InverseBlueMask = 7; // 00000111
    private const byte InverseGreenMask = 3; // 00000011
    private const byte InverseRedMask = 7; //  00000111

    //private const byte InverseBValueMask = 31; // 00011111
    //private const byte InverseGValueMask = 231; // 11100111
    //private const byte InverseRValueMask = 248; //  11111000



  public void getEachBitOfMessage(byte byteToManipulate, int colour)
    {
        byte value = 0;
        byte returnByte = 0; 


        if (colour == BLUE)
        {
            value = (byte)(byteToManipulate | BValueMask);
            value = (byte)(value >> 5);
            returnByte = (byte)(byteToManipulate | InverseBlueMask);
            returnByte = (byte)(returnByte & value);
            String theByte = returnByte.ToString(); 

        }
        else if (colour == GREEN)
        {
            value = (byte)(byteToManipulate | GValueMask);
            value = (byte)(value >> 3);
            returnByte = (byte)(byteToManipulate | InverseGreenMask);
            returnByte = (byte)(returnByte & value);
            String theByte = returnByte.ToString(); 

        }
        else if (colour == RED)
        {
            value = (byte)(byteToManipulate | RValueMask);
            returnByte = (byte)(byteToManipulate | InverseRedMask);
            returnByte = (byte)(returnByte & value);
            String theByte = returnByte.ToString(); 

        }
     }

This is the method i use to put bits of the message into each byte of colour.

    private const byte BlueMask = 248; // 11111000
    private const byte GreenMask = 252; // 11111100
    private const byte RedMask = 248; //  11111000
    private const byte BValueMask = 224; // 11100000
    private const byte GValueMask = 24; // 00011000
    private const byte RValueMask = 7; //  00000111



     public byte changeEachBit(byte byteToManipulate, int colour, byte theMessage)
     {

        byte value = 0;
        byte returnByte = 0; 

        if (colour == BLUE)
        {
           value= (byte)(theMessage & BValueMask);
           value = (byte)(value >> 5); 
           returnByte = (byte)(byteToManipulate & BlueMask);
           returnByte = (byte)(returnByte | value); 

        }
        else if (colour == GREEN)
        {
            value = (byte)(theMessage & GValueMask);
            value = (byte)(value >> 3);
            returnByte = (byte)(byteToManipulate & GreenMask);
            returnByte = (byte)(returnByte | value);

        }
        else if (colour == RED)
        {
            value = (byte)(theMessage & RValueMask);
            returnByte = (byte)(byteToManipulate & RedMask);
            returnByte = (byte)(returnByte | value);

        }
     }
share|improve this question
3  
Just a suggestion: bit masks are much easier to read in hex. –  John3136 Mar 21 '12 at 0:57
    
I'm still confused, but I believe my answer is right. To get red (2 in the e.g. above) you use red = someVal & 0x07. Seriously: trying to explain what you are doing to someone else might help you spot the problem. So far the explanation seems mighty complex for what should be a trivial exercise in bit manipulation. –  John3136 Mar 21 '12 at 5:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This works..

    private const byte InverseBlueMask = 7; // 00000111
    private const byte InverseGreenMask = 3; // 00000011
    private const byte InverseRedMask = 7; //  00000111

    public void getEachBitOfMessage(byte byteToManipulate, int colour)
    {
        byte value = 0;

        if (countToByte == 3)
        {
            byte blueAreaInTotal = 0;
            byte greenAreaInTotal = 0;
            byte redAreaInTotal = 0;
            byte total = 0; 

            redAreaInTotal = (byte)(redCount);
            blueAreaInTotal = (byte)(blueCount << 5);
            greenAreaInTotal = (byte)(greenCount << 3);

            total = (byte)(total | redAreaInTotal); 
            total = (byte)(total | blueAreaInTotal);
            total = (byte)(total | greenAreaInTotal); 
            convertToChar(total);

            redCount = 0;
            blueCount = 0;
            greenCount = 0; 
            countToByte = 0; 
        }

        if (colour == BLUE)
        {
            value = (byte)(byteToManipulate & InverseBlueMask);
            blueCount = value; 
        }
        else if (colour == GREEN)
        {
            value = (byte)(byteToManipulate & InverseGreenMask);
            greenCount = value; 

        }
        else if (colour == RED)
        {
            value = (byte)(byteToManipulate & InverseRedMask);
            redCount = value; 
        }

        countToByte++; 
    }
share|improve this answer

From each byte if i extract the last 3 bits in the red byte, last 2 bits in the green byte and the last 3 bits in the blue byte, how would i accomplish this?

This will mask out all except the lower n bits you asked for.

red &= 0x07;
green &= 0x03;
blue &= 0x07;
share|improve this answer
    
hmm... this appears to be giving me random values, not at all what i'm looking to get back. Is the way i'm writing the values into the bytes proper? –  BigBug Mar 21 '12 at 1:41
    
Random values between 0-7 for blue and red and 0-3 for green? –  John3136 Mar 21 '12 at 1:44
    
umm... well for instance, the string i put into the image is "2008".. so i'm expecting the bits i collect back from one byte of Red, one byte of Green and one byte of Blue to be the value "2" on the first round... however, red = "2", green = "2" and blue = "1"... –  BigBug Mar 21 '12 at 2:01
    
I'm really confused about what you are actually trying to do: you've just introduced strings - a 4 byte string no less. Does each of the 4 bytes contain a full set of RGBs? It's a bit like trying to describe a painting with the lights turned out. Perhaps you should edit your question and provide a bit more context. –  John3136 Mar 21 '12 at 2:25
    
sorry sorry, so say we're putting in the value "2" from the string. 2 is one byte, so i take 3 bits of the 2 and put it into R, the next 2 bits of the value 2 and put it into Green, the last 3 bits of the value 2 and put it into blue... does that make sense? Red is one byte, Green is one byte, Blue is one byte.. hope that makes more sense? –  BigBug Mar 21 '12 at 2:35
private const byte BValueMask = 224; // 11100000

/* ... */

    if (colour == BLUE)
    {
        value = (byte)(byteToManipulate | BValueMask);
        value = (byte)(value >> 5);

The effect here is to turn on the upper three bits and then throw away the lower five bits. You might as well just write: value = 7;. Perhaps these three sets of statements were intended to use a different mask or intended to use a different bit operation?

share|improve this answer
1  
Looks like the OP meant to use AND rather than OR. –  500 - Internal Server Error Mar 21 '12 at 1:05
    
Of course, those bits get thrown away during the shift anyway. –  Ben Voigt Mar 25 '12 at 3:05

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