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So let's say I want to pass in an object containing settings to my class in JavaScript, but also provide default options, how would I do that easily? For example:

myClass = function(options){
    var defaults = {
        foo: 'foo',
        bar: 'bar'
    };
};
customOptions = {
    bar: 'foobar'
};
myInstance = new myClass(customOptions);

So in this case, I would like for myInstance() to use foo='foo' since it was not specified by the user, and bar='foobar' as that was set by the user.

Now, I'll be dealing with a bigger and more complex JSON object, obviously, and it seems inefficient and hard to maintain to check every property every time, so is there some way to combine these objects easily, overwriting as needed, with the user supplied properties always taking precedence?

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The answers have the obvious option, but you could also put the defaults on the [[Prototype]] and override them on the instance. –  RobG Mar 21 '12 at 2:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can check if the custom options object contains the properties you are looking for, and if not set default values.

myClass = function(options) {
    this.foo = options.foo || 'foo';
    this.bar = options.bar || 'bar';
};
customOptions = {
    bar: 'foobar'
};
myInstance = new myClass(customOptions);
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I really feel like I should have thought of that... Thank you! –  Chris Sobolewski Mar 21 '12 at 2:34

You could do something like this:

var MyClass = function (options) {
    var defaults = {foo: 1, bar: 2};

    for (var option in defaults) {
      this[option] = options[option] || defaults[option];           
    }
}

var customOptions = { bar: 5};
var c = new MyClass(customOptions);

Basically loop through the custom options passed in and add any missing options with their defaults. In this case c.foo = 1 and c.bar = 5. Fiddle available at http://jsfiddle.net/2Ve3M/.

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You could try something like this:

myClass = function(options){
    var myOptions = {
        foo: options.foo || 'foo',
        bar: options.bar || 'bar'
    };
};

If you are using jQuery you could also look at http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.extend/

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