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I feel like I was always taught to use LEFT JOINs and I often see them mixed with INNERs to accomplish the same type of query throughout several pieces of code that are supposed to do the same thing on different pages. Here goes:

SELECT ac.reac, pt.pt_name, soc.soc_name, pt.pt_soc_code
FROM
  AECounts ac
  INNER JOIN 1_low_level_term llt on ac.reac = llt.llt_name
  LEFT JOIN 1_pref_term pt ON llt.pt_code = pt.pt_code
  LEFT JOIN 1_soc_term soc ON pt.pt_soc_code = soc.soc_code
LIMIT 100,10000

Thats one I am working on:

I see a lot like:

SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT p.`case`) as count
FROM FDA_CaseReports cr
  INNER JOIN ae_indi i ON i.isr = cr.isr
  LEFT JOIN ae_case_profile p ON cr.isr = p.isr

This seems like the LEFT may as well be INNER is there any catch?

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Thanks for the code cleanup michael, was just going back to to that, +1 –  cerd Mar 21 '12 at 2:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Is there any catch? Yes there is -- left joins are a form of outer join, while inner joins are a form of, well, inner join.

Here's examples that show the difference. We'll start with the base data:

mysql> select * from j1;
+----+------------+
| id | thing      |
+----+------------+
|  1 | hi         |
|  2 | hello      |
|  3 | guten tag  |
|  4 | ciao       |
|  5 | buongiorno |
+----+------------+

mysql> select * from j2;
+----+-----------+
| id | thing     |
+----+-----------+
|  1 | bye       |
|  3 | tschau    |
|  4 | au revoir |
|  6 | so long   |
|  7 | tschuessi |
+----+-----------+

And here we'll see the difference between an inner join and a left join:

mysql> select * from j1 inner join j2 on j1.id = j2.id;
+----+-----------+----+-----------+
| id | thing     | id | thing     |
+----+-----------+----+-----------+
|  1 | hi        |  1 | bye       |
|  3 | guten tag |  3 | tschau    |
|  4 | ciao      |  4 | au revoir |
+----+-----------+----+-----------+

Hmm, 3 rows.

mysql> select * from j1 left join j2 on j1.id = j2.id;
+----+------------+------+-----------+
| id | thing      | id   | thing     |
+----+------------+------+-----------+
|  1 | hi         |    1 | bye       |
|  2 | hello      | NULL | NULL      |
|  3 | guten tag  |    3 | tschau    |
|  4 | ciao       |    4 | au revoir |
|  5 | buongiorno | NULL | NULL      |
+----+------------+------+-----------+

Wow, 5 rows! What happened?

Outer joins such as left join preserve rows that don't match -- so rows with id 2 and 5 are preserved by the left join query. The remaining columns are filled in with NULL.

In other words, left and inner joins are not interchangeable.

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Hi thanks for this, this is a perfect explaination for newbie. –  user1149244 May 30 '13 at 10:58

Here's a rough answer, that is sort of how I think about joins. Hoping this will be more helpful than a very precise answer due to the aforementioned math issues... ;-)

Inner joins narrow down the set of rows returns. Outer joins (left or right) don't change number of rows returned, but just "pick up" additional columns if possible.

In your first example, the result will be rows from AECounts that match the conditions specified to the 1_low_level_term table. Then for those rows, it tries to join to 1_pref_term and 1_soc_term. But if there's no match, the rows remain and the joined in columns are null.

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1  
good explanation from a new user, +1 –  deltree Mar 21 '12 at 17:36
    
+1. Nice answer. Welcome to stackoverflow rob. –  Leigh Mar 22 '12 at 1:15
    
Thanks very much. Might should add that an outer join can add rows, if joining on non-unique keys, but... –  rob Mar 22 '12 at 3:03

An INNER JOIN will only return the rows where there are matching values in both tables, whereas a LEFT JOIN will return ALL the rows from the LEFT table even if there is no matching row in the RIGHT table

A quick example

TableA
ID   Value
1    TableA.Value1
2    TableA.Value2
3    TableA.Value3

TableB
ID   Value
2    TableB.ValueB
3    TableB.ValueC

An INNER JOIN produces:

SELECT a.ID,a.Value,b.ID,b.Value 
FROM TableA a INNER JOIN TableB b ON b.ID = a.ID

a.ID    a.Value            b.ID    b.Value
2       TableA.Value2      2       TableB.ValueB
3       TableA.Value3      3       TableB.ValueC

A LEFT JOIN produces:

SELECT a.ID,a.Value,b.ID,b.Value 
FROM TableA a LEFT JOIN TableB b ON b.ID = a.ID

a.ID    a.Value            b.ID    b.Value
1       TableA.Value1      NULL    NULL
2       TableA.Value2      2       TableB.ValueB
3       TableA.Value3      3       TableB.ValueC

As you can see, the LEFT JOIN includes the row from TableA where ID = 1 even though there's no matching row in TableB where ID = 1, whereas the INNER JOIN excludes the row specifically because there's no matching row in TableB

HTH

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