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I'm attempting to use Backbone.js to simplify data (JSON) management and interaction with DOM.

Firstly, I'm not sure if Backbone.js can indeed simplify and improve the current process, but I'd like to assume it can.

Previously I'm retrieving the data with jQuery AJAX function. Now, I'm retrieving the data(still with AJAX) Backbone style into the Backbone model.

For update, previously I was parsing through the JSON object itself to update data. I would then send back the updated json to the back-end (just as I've received it).

Now, is it possible to use the set function in Backbone to simplify something like the below and ideally where should the set attribute behaviour (and all other UI bindings like change events) be constructed? Would it be on the fetch() success handler, which is in the View initializer?

function setBucketOffer(bucketName, newId) {
    var segments = json.segments;
    for (var i = 0; i < segments.length; i++) {
        if (segments[i].market.toLowerCase() === g_market) {

            var genders = segments[i].gender;
            for (var i = 0; i < genders.length; i++) {
                if (genders[i].name.toLowerCase() === g_segment) {

                    var buckets = genders[i].buckets;
                    for (var i = 0; i < buckets.length; i++) {
                        if (buckets[i].name === bucketName) {

                            buckets[i].confirm = newId;
                            return;
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

Example JSON

{
    "segments": [
        {
            "market": "Market1",
            "gender": [
                {
                    "name": "male",
                    "buckets": [
                        {
                            "name": "Market1_M_CBD",
                            "subscribers": "50,000",
                            "postcode": "20000-2010",
                            "lastsend": "13/03/12 4:30PM",
                            "suggest": "10054",
                            "confirm": ""
                        },
                        {
                            "name": "Market1_M_North",
                            "subscribers": "50,000",
                            "postcode": "20000-2010",
                            "lastsend": "13/03/12 4:30PM",
                            "suggest": "10054",
                            "confirm": ""
                        }
                    ]
                },
                {
                    "name": "female",
                    "buckets": [
                        {
                            "name": "Market1_F_CBD",
                            "subscribers": "50,000",
                            "postcode": "20000-2010",
                            "lastsend": "13/03/12 4:30PM",
                            "suggest": "10054",
                            "confirm": "10054"
                        }
                    ]
                }
            ]
        },
        {
            "market": "Market2",
            "gender": [
                {
                    "name": "male",
                    "buckets": [
                        {
                            "name": "Market2_M_CBD",
                            "subscribers": "50,000",
                            "postcode": "20000-2010",
                            "lastsend": "13/03/12 4:30PM",
                            "suggest": "10054",
                            "confirm": "10054"
                        },
                        {
                            "name": "Market2_M_North",
                            "subscribers": "50,000",
                            "postcode": "20000-2010",
                            "lastsend": "13/03/12 4:30PM",
                            "suggest": "10054",
                            "confirm": "10054"
                        },
                        {
                            "name": "Market2_M_South",
                            "subscribers": "50,000",
                            "postcode": "20000-2010",
                            "lastsend": "13/03/12 4:30PM",
                            "suggest": "10054",
                            "confirm": "10054"
                        }
                    ]
                }
            ]
        }
    ]
}

Edit 1

From here, I'm trying to make good use of Parse and to get just segments from my JSON:

var Offers = Backbone.Collection.extend({
    url: 'URL',
    parse: function (response) {
        return response.segments;
    }
});

Here, I'm getting more than just response.segments. Also not sure if it's right for me to use the render function or fetch success function to populate the DOM. Suppose I have my html template in the DOM... I want to clone it using jQuery clone() and populate the clone using a forEach on segments, and push back all the clones into the html body. Is this workable in backbone, how would you do it? (I'm able to do this without backbone.js, but would like to see how I can improve with backbone.js, and bind all the data on the clones to model changes)

var OfferView = Backbone.View.extend({
    initialize: function () {
        this.model = new Offers();
        this.model.fetch({
            success: function (collection, response) {
                console.log(response);
            }
        });
        this.model.on('change', this.modelChange);
        this.model.on('change', this.render);
        this.modelChange = function () {
            alert('model changed');
        };
    },
    render: function () {

    }
});

Edit 2

I'm up to creating individual views through a forEach but am having trouble inserting these back into the DOM. What am I doing wrong? (Not sure around the return this part)

// DEFINE VIEW
var OfferView = Backbone.View.extend({
    initialize: function () {
        this.model = new Offers();
        this.model.fetch();
        this.model.on('change', this.modelChange);
        this.model.on('change', this.render);
        this.modelChange = function () {
            alert('model changed');
        };
        this.render();
    },
    render: function () {
        var self = this;
        this.model.forEach(function (s) {
            var view = new OfferMarketView({
                id: "container" + s.get('name').toLowerCase().replace(/\s*/g, '')
            });
            $('#leftCol').append(view.el);
        });
        return this;
    }
});
var OfferMarketView = Backbone.View.extend({
    tagName: "div",
    className: "marketContainer",
    events: {},
    render: function() {
    }
});
share|improve this question
    
what does your JSON response look like and what does your model look like? It's hard to help without seeing them. –  tkone Mar 21 '12 at 3:07
    
I don't need an exact working alternative. Would just like the last paragraph of the question addressed, for any json > backbone model that has multiple nesting. –  bcm Mar 21 '12 at 3:16
    
It' shard to say without looking at a sample of your JSON. I mean, yes, you can do it. How? THat's a great question. You might have to transform your JSON first. You might need to use a backbone plug in. You might be able to do it straight up. Without seeing more code it's difficult to give you a better answer though. –  tkone Mar 21 '12 at 3:18
    
added sample JSON –  bcm Mar 21 '12 at 3:29
    
New question posted here, with regards to getting the child views back into the DOM. stackoverflow.com/questions/9799623/… –  bcm Mar 21 '12 at 6:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Whenever you call fetch on a model the response is passed through a parse method that can be defined in your model. parse takes one parameter, the ajax response:

parse: function(response) {

}

In that function you can do whatever you want with the data that comes back from your ajax request and eventually return that object. The object returned by the parse method will be set on your model.

For event binding, you'll want to do that in your view. In the initialize method of your view you can do something like:

this.collection.on("change", this.someFunction);

Now, any time something causes that model to trigger its change event someFunction ( also defined in your view ) will run.

EDIT

The sample json you added to the question looks to be pretty normalized. With that data, I'd be fetching it into a collection. If that's the structure you want your models to look like then you don't need to do much parsing.

in you collection file if you create a parse method that does the following:

parse: function(response) {
    return response.segments;
}

When you call your fetch, this.collection.fetch() on a successful request, your collection will be filled with models that contain attributes in a structure that matches your response.

EDIT 2

Your binding looks ok.

in this section of code:

this.collection.fetch({
    success: function (model, attributes) {
        initAll(attributes);

        // populate ui with attributes from model
    }
})

The parameters that are passed back on a success in a collection fetch are (collection, response) collection is the result of collection call and what this.collection will end up being. response is the response of your ajax request.

I'm not sure what initAll(attributes) is supposed to be doing. If you add a parse method like I posted above, your collection will contain a set of models with the attributes of each segment.

Also, rather than calling this.render() at the end, you could do bind render to the change event:

this.collection.on('change', this.render);

That way any time your collection changes, that view will automatically render again so your changes will show up.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Ryan, thanks for the tip for parse. I can imagine it will be useful. For the change on model, can you have a look a see if the code for that I've added is correct/ideal? –  bcm Mar 21 '12 at 3:44
    
When I console log the collection, I get the whole backbone object. Also when I console log the response, I get the full JSON response. The parse doesn't seeme to have any effect... Is this right? // DEFINE MODEL Offer = Backbone.Model.extend(); var Offers = Backbone.Collection.extend({ model: Offer, url: 'URL', parse: function (response) { return response.segments } }); –  bcm Mar 21 '12 at 4:11
    
You don't need to define a model unless you have a model that youve extended and need to use that. Backbone will create models and put them into your collection for you. When you console log the collection you should see an attribute called models, each one of those should have an attribute named attributes and in there will be the data for each item. Response shows the untouched response from the server, so yes, that's correct you should see everything there. –  ryanmarc Mar 21 '12 at 4:22
    
Hi Ryan, thanks for your explanation. I've removed the model and just used Collection with parse inside. I'm still quite blocked and hope my Edit 1 above will explain better what I hope to accomplish. –  bcm Mar 21 '12 at 4:49
1  
You shouldn't be trying to use the response that comes back in your success. At that point, it's there for reference if you need it, but assuming everything went correctly you should be using your returned collection from this point on throughout your app. –  ryanmarc Mar 21 '12 at 5:02

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