Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to restrict public access to some objects we have stored in S3, but show other objects in the same hierarchy of keys. For example, assume I want to make bucketname/* publicly readable. But want to prevent access to bucketname/*/hidden/* for any users that are not expressly given access in IAM.

I can do that with a bucket policy like:

{
  "Id": "Policy123",
  "Statement": [
    {
      "Sid": "Stmt123",
      "Action": [ "s3:GetObject" ],
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::bucketname/*",
      "Principal": {
        "AWS": [ "*" ]
      }
    },
    {
      "Sid": "Stmt124",
      "Action": [ "s3:GetObject" ],
      "Effect": "Deny",
      "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::bucketname/*/hidden/*",
      "Principal": {
        "AWS": [ "*" ]
      }
  ]
}

But that prevents any IAM users/groups I have granted from accessing the hidden objects. Is there a setting for Principal in the second statement that only matches unauthenticated access? Or better yet, is there a way to list only those Principals that should NOT be affected by a policy statement?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

According to AWS support, this is currently not possible. Any Deny policy overrides a matching (or subset) Allow policy and there is no way to deny anonymous access only.

A similar effect can be achieved by specifying a private ACL for all objects matching bucketname/*/hidden/*, but that is not as flexible and must be applied manually.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You don't need to set the policy on the bucket. In fact you can apply this same policy on the IAM user or group depending on what works best in your scenario.

https://console.aws.amazon.com/iam/home?#

  • Users
  • Select desired user
  • Click permissions tab
  • Attach user policy
  • Custom policy
  • Select
  • Copy and paste policy
  • Apply Policy

Sometimes extra permissions need to be added to the user so they can see the buckets to navigate. If for example they're using cloud berry you will need to give them list access to the main buckets. See for example one of my policies.

{
  "Statement": [
    {
      "Sid": "Stmt1330983243489",
      "Action": [
        "s3:*"
      ],
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Resource": [
        "arn:aws:s3:::<allowbucket1>",
        "arn:aws:s3:::<allowbucket1>/*"
      ]
    },
    {
      "Sid": "Stmt1330983260440",
      "Action": [
        "s3:ListAllMyBuckets"
      ],
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Resource": [
        "arn:aws:s3:::*"
      ]
    },
    {
      "Sid": "Stmt1330983357419",
      "Action": [
        "s3:CreateBucket",
        "s3:DeleteBucket",
        "s3:PutBucketNotification",
        "s3:PutBucketPolicy",
        "s3:PutBucketRequestPayment"
      ],
      "Effect": "Deny",
      "Resource": [
        "arn:aws:s3:::*"
      ]
    }
  ]
}
share|improve this answer
    
I do need a bucket policy to handle unauthenticated access. The IAM users have been granted access to all of the objects in their own policies. The Deny policy on the bucket for */hidden/* prevents the IAM users from seeing those objects. I edited the question to make this clearer. –  bkirkbri Mar 21 '12 at 18:21
    
You can add a allow rule with principle set to something like this arm:aws:iam::<account>:<username> in the bucket policy. This should allow this user access. To allow all users from iam access put a * for the username. Then you can use iam permissions to deny access to the bucket for authenticated users. –  bwight Mar 21 '12 at 22:26
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.