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An unhandled exception of type 'System.StackOverflowException' occurred in wcfserviceLibrary.DLL

the code is show as follows.

[DataContract]
public class memberdesignations
{
    [DataMember]
    public string DesigId
    {
        get { return DesigId; }
        set { DesigId = value;}
    }
    [DataMember]
    public string DesignationName
    {
        get { return DesignationName; }
        set { DesignationName = value; }
    }

}

then i have method of Type memberdesignations as follows

public List<memberdesignations> memberdesignations()
    {
        List<memberdesignations> designations = new List<memberdesignations>();
        memberdesignations objmemDesignations;
        ds = objbll.Get_Member_Designations();
        DataView dv = new DataView();
        dv = ds.Tables[0].DefaultView;
        foreach (DataRowView drow in dv)
        {
            objmemDesignations = new memberdesignations();
            objmemDesignations.DesigId = drow["DesignationId"].ToString();
            objmemDesignations.DesignationName = drow["DesignationName"].ToString();
            designations.Add(objmemDesignations);
        }
        return designations;
    }

iam getting the error in the class containing the get set properties.

But i was able to get rid of the error when i modified the class like this :

 [DataContract]
public class memberdesignations
{
    [DataMember]
    public string DesigId
    {
        get;  set;
    }
    [DataMember]
    public string DesignationName
    {
        get; set;
    }
}

On searching the forum , i found the cause for it was and explained by Konamiman here

i would like to know the difference between the two different ways for properties explained by Konamiman

or any other explanation would be appreciated.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
you should accept an answer below. –  Valamas - AUS Jun 18 '12 at 6:02
    
@Valamas i accepted the answer , thanks for reminding me. –  Mourya Jun 18 '12 at 12:18
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The issue is that, as Konamiman said, you are calling a property recursively.

Let's say I have a string property "DesignationName".

public string DesignationName
{
  //Some getter to return some data
  //Some setter to set the data
}

What would you expect it to return? How about returning a hard-coded string _designationName;

private string _designationName = "someName";
public string DesignationName
{
  get {return _designationName;}
  //Some setter to set the data
}

That works. But what would happen if I had it return itself,instead?

public string DesignationName { get {return DesignatioName;} //Some setter to set the data }

Well, it would keep calling DesignationName, which would keep calling itself again, which would again call DesignationName...and so on. All of this puts data on the stack, and goes on forever until is overruns the allocated space for the stack. Voila, a stackoverflow.

The reason your last example works is because it is using what is called an 'autoproperty', a new feature to .NET 2.0 (I think). Basically, behind the scenes, it is creating backing fields for your properties so that this:

public string DesignationName
{
  get;
  set;
}

actually compiles to behave like this:

private string _designationName = string.Empty;
public string DesignationName
{
  get { return _designationName; }
  set { _designationName = value; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Auto-implemented properties were a feature of C# 3.0 :) –  Bryan Crosby Mar 21 '12 at 5:02
    
@Killnine so i can go with just get; set;. thanks for the explanation. –  Mourya Mar 21 '12 at 5:09
    
After Referrening to all the answers posted here ,i visited MSDN article which has detailed explanation about the properties. visit the link here –  Mourya Mar 21 '12 at 5:30
    
Yep, but it's good to understand what is happening behind the scenes. Let's in the case where you are using, say, a List<int> for the return type. It's important to know get;set; will NOT initialize this list for you automatically. So if you forget to initialize it in a constructor (call new List<int>()), it will return a null reference exception. –  Killnine Mar 21 '12 at 5:32
    
@Killnine if thats the case then i will prefer to doing it explicitly using private and public property combination, instead leaving it to the compiler to do it. –  Mourya Mar 21 '12 at 5:35
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You are referring to the property itself in the setter, so it will be calling itself recursively.(Over and over again until your stack overflows)

By using the short hand notation with just get; and set;, you are basically adding an implied backing field (like a backing variable). This way your not triggering a recursive calls since your property is just a wrapper around the backing field.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for the explanation , now i understood the main cause for the error –  Mourya Mar 21 '12 at 5:03
add comment

declare private variables for both : _desigId, _designationName. You are in a recursive-loop that will go on infinitely. return the private variables, rather than the properties.

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