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I am fairly new to writing C code and I am sure I have something wrong at the very basic level. I am running a small code to get the attributes of a file and this function below returns those attributes. char *path would contain something like "/home/etc/bin"

/* copy the attributes into a character pointer */
unsigned char * copyAttributes (char *path)
{
    struct stat buf;
    stat (path, &buf);
    int nMalloc = sizeof(dev_t) + sizeof(ino_t) + sizeof(mode_t)+ sizeof(nlink_t)+ sizeof(uid_t)+ sizeof(gid_t)+ sizeof(dev_t)+ sizeof(off_t)+ sizeof(blksize_t)+ sizeof(blkcnt_t)+ sizeof(time_t)+ sizeof(time_t)+ sizeof(time_t)+ 1;
    char *pathForStatBuff = malloc(nMalloc);
    printf("%d\n",nMalloc);
    unsigned long base = 0;
    memcpy(pathForStatBuff + base,&buf.st_dev,sizeof(dev_t));
    base = base + sizeof(dev_t);    
    memcpy(pathForStatBuff + base,&buf.st_ino,sizeof(ino_t));
    base = base + sizeof(ino_t);
    memcpy(pathForStatBuff + base,&buf.st_mode,sizeof(mode_t));
    base = base + sizeof(mode_t);
    memcpy(pathForStatBuff + base,&buf.st_nlink,sizeof(nlink_t));
    base = base + sizeof(nlink_t);
    memcpy(pathForStatBuff + base,&buf.st_uid,sizeof(uid_t));
    base = base + sizeof(uid_t);
    memcpy(pathForStatBuff + base,&buf.st_gid,sizeof(gid_t));
    base = base + sizeof(gid_t);
    memcpy(pathForStatBuff + base,&buf.st_rdev,sizeof(dev_t));
    base = base + sizeof(dev_t);
    memcpy(pathForStatBuff + base,&buf.st_size,sizeof(off_t));
    base = base + sizeof(off_t);
    memcpy(pathForStatBuff + base,&buf.st_blksize,sizeof(blksize_t));
    base = base + sizeof(blksize_t);
    memcpy(pathForStatBuff + base,&buf.st_blocks,sizeof(blkcnt_t));
    base = base + sizeof(blkcnt_t);
    memcpy(pathForStatBuff + base,&buf.st_atime,sizeof(time_t));
    base = base + sizeof(time_t);
    memcpy(pathForStatBuff + base,&buf.st_mtime,sizeof(time_t));
    base = base + sizeof(time_t);
    memcpy(pathForStatBuff + base,&buf.st_ctime,sizeof(time_t));
    base = base + sizeof(time_t);   

    printf("Printing pathForStatBuff = %s\n",pathForStatBuff);
    return pathForStatBuff;
}

Printing pathForStatBuff = p 53 Printing pathForStatBuff = p 53 Printing pathForStatBuff = p 53 Printing pathForStatBuff = p 53 Printing pathForStatBuff = p 53 Printing pathForStatBuff = p 53 Printing pathForStatBuff = p 53 Printing pathForStatBuff = p 53 Printing pathForStatBuff = p 53 Printing pathForStatBuff = p 53 Printing pathForStatBuff = p

This is the output I always get, I can't seem to figure out what I am doing wrong. Could you guys guide me on what it might be. Thanks.

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What in the world is the intent of this code? Why are you trying to construct a structure yourself with memcpy rather than just allocating space for the stat structure itself and returning that? If you're trying to make the format of the resulting data "portable", this is not the way to do it because the endianness and sizes of the types involved is system-specific... –  R.. Mar 21 '12 at 4:54
    
I don't have a clue what you're trying to do here. You know that you can simply return a struct stat from your function, right? Why does it need to be in a char *? –  Greg Hewgill Mar 21 '12 at 4:54
    
I wanna make a MD5 of the stat of the file. This is code I run later with the return value of the above function MD5Init (&md5_context); MD5Update (&md5_context, returnValueOfAboveCode, strlen(returnValueOfAboveCode)); MD5Final (out, &md5_context); –  user1067334 Mar 21 '12 at 4:56
    
So call MD5Update(&md5_context, (char *)&buf, sizeof(buf)); where buf is a struct stat buf as above. You don't need to fiddle around with copying data piecemeal like this. –  Greg Hewgill Mar 21 '12 at 4:58
    
To add on to that comment, I am making a message digest of the stat of the file. And the MD5Update function expects a character pointer, hence the conversion of the struct stat to a char. The issue I am facing is how do I get the data into the char* –  user1067334 Mar 21 '12 at 4:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

At first sight, the code:

int nMalloc = sizeof(dev_t)  + sizeof(ino_t) + sizeof(mode_t)+ ...

is doing exactly the same as

int nMalloc = sizeof(struct stat);

Edit: WARNING - caf pointed out that the

int nMalloc = sizeof(dev_t)  + sizeof(ino_t) + ...

is not necessarily exactly the same as int nMalloc = sizeof(struct stat);

The fields within struct stat might have alignment constraints which cause there to be 'holes' or padding in between fields. There might also be undocumented fields. So struct stat might be bigger than the sum of its published fields.

This would be straightforward to check.

if (nMalloc != sizeof(struct stat)) { fprintf(stderr, "...\n"); 

but might change in future, so your original is more robust.

Based on caf's proposition, this is also not necessarily identical:

unsigned long base = 0;
memcpy(pathForStatBuff + base,&buf.st_dev,sizeof(dev_t));
base = base + sizeof(dev_t);    
...
memcpy(pathForStatBuff + base,&buf.st_ctime,sizeof(time_t));
base = base + sizeof(time_t); 

to: memcpy(pathForStatBuff, &buf, sizeof(struct stat));

but the size test would detect that.

So, field assignment to a new struct would allow you to get control of the fields needed, their order, and some aspects of layout (same compiler/same platform).

If memcpy is preferred, look at mempcpy. It is like memcpy, but returns a pointer to the byte after the last one, so you don't need to do:

p = memcpy(pathForStatBuf  + base, ...
base = base + sizeof(...)
...
base = base + sizeof(...)
p = memcpy(pathForStatBuf  + base, ...
base = base + sizeof(...)

but instead have an extra pointer and do

p = memcpy(p, ...
p = memcpy(p, ...

Do you want to get a printable form? If that is the case, you will need to use sprintf, printf, or fprintf. As you are learning, I would convert all of the memcpy's to printf("..., buf....field ...); and see them immediately, that will be easier than getting a string right first time.

share|improve this answer
    
This works for me, for now. But I have another question: If I did not want all the parts of the structure to be copied over and just a few parts of the structure to be copied over, would I have to define my own structure. For example, what if I did not want &buf.st_ctime to be copied into the pathForStatBuff? Thank you. The answer is very helpful. I made on overkill with the code I wrote. –  user1067334 Mar 21 '12 at 5:07
    
If you want to copy your struct to another struct of the exact same type, you can use the assignment operator or memcpy, but if the types differ (meaning, some fields added, some left out, or order was changed) anything except copying the desired fields one by one will suffer from portability problems, so I'd say it's the best way. –  Guido Mar 21 '12 at 5:13
    
If you are doing this to debug stuff, leave the printf statements. If you want to build a structure which is a subset of stat, and maybe a different order, then yes, you could memcpy it field by field, but it might be clearer to you if you did define the new structure. Depending on your compiler (almost all do), structure assignment will work, so no memcpy. If it doesn't work, the compiler will throw an error.So you could say newstruct.st_dev = buf.st_dev; which is easier to read, and type safe. –  gbulmer Mar 21 '12 at 5:15
    
You are neglecting the possibility of padding and/or extra unnamed members in the struct stat. –  caf Mar 21 '12 at 5:17
    
@caf - sorry, I don't understand the point you are making - a field by field memcpy will also be "neglecting the possibility of padding and/or extra unnamed members in the struct stat". If the OP wants a subset of struct stat, how else would they do it? –  gbulmer Mar 21 '12 at 5:21

You are trying to use binary data as a string. In C strings ends with a zero, which means that if one member is zero then when you copy it into the buffer it will be marking the end of the string.

If you want to convert all data to a string you should use e.g. snprintf instead:

char buffer[128];
snprintf(buffer, sizeof(buffer), "%d %d %d",
         buf.st_dev, buf.st_ino, buf.st_mode);

See the manual page for snprintf for more information about the function.

(In my example I only used three members of the structure, add all you need.)

share|improve this answer

You're copying the data with no transformation what-so-ever, so if buf.st_dev turned out to have a least significant byte of 0 (I'm assuming little endian) you'll end up with an empty string, from your example it looks like the LSB is always 'p' (113). You could try using a function to which you give the string along with it's length and it prints it in hexadecimal, this way you could see the data. You need to keep the difference between a number and it's decimal representation in mind, the number 231 has no similarity to the string "231" Otherwise you could do something like:

sprintf(pathForStatBuf, "Dev: %d\nIno: %d\n....", buf.st_dev, buf.st_ino, ...);

The downside to that is that the buffer size is not easy to define.

I guess you're only doing this to learn about stat and stuff, so you could just allocate a big string (2048 chars or so) and you should stay within bounds.

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You are copying the data into your memory block fine. The only problem is that you can't use printf with %s to show the result, because it's not a null terminated string (or a string of any kind).

If you want to print out the contents of the memory block for debugging purposes, you could print it in hex:

{
    int i;

    printf("Printing pathForStatBuff = { ");
    for (i = 0; i < sizeof nMalloc; i++)
        printf("%#.2x ", (unsigned char)pathForStatBuff[i]);
    printf("}\n");
}
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