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I am a very proficient C# developer, but need to start writing code that works on the JVM. The Java language is feature poor compared to C# these days, so I was interested in the features that Scala offers.

However, when hearing that in Scala, all operators are simply methods, I became suspicious of the performance impact that would have on math-heavy computations (which is important for the types of applications my team writes)

So I ran some simple int based tests, and find that Scala is about 30x slower than the equivalent Java code. Not good! Can anyone tell me what I'm doing wrong? or how to improve the computational performance of the scala example to be on par with Java?

UPDATE1: as pointed out by the first two answers, I was being a super-noob and running this in the IntelliJ IDE. I don't know how to run the scala app via the java command line, which may be an IntelliJ issue. Thanks for the help guys, I'll need to investigate simple commandline execution of scala before I continue with perf testing, as the IDE given results are obviously too inaccurate.

UPDATE2: Luigi in the comments says in IntelliJ he gets equal times, so it seems that my wild difference isn't due to IntelliJ? Any other ideas on what this could be? I'll try getting this running via command line and post an update with my results.

UPDATE3: after running this via commandline, I get the same 30x perf difference.
My computer is a 3core AMD x64 3.4Ghz, running J2SE 6 jdk 64bit 1.6.0_31, Window7.

Here are my runtimes: Java: 210ms.
Scala: between 2000 and 7400ms (generally the 7000 range)

so, i suppose the question is still open. why is scala running so slow on my platform? something with the java 64bit runtime, or with Java 6?

runtime versions:

C:\Users\jason>java -showversion
java version "1.6.0_31"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_31-b05)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 20.6-b01, mixed mode)

C:\Users\jason>scala
Welcome to Scala version 2.9.1-1 (Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM, Java 1.6.0_31).

UPDATE 4 while my original test has a 30x difference, increasing the iterations to 100000000 causes the difference to shrink to about 33%, so it seems scala was still being dominated by some unknown initialization cost on my machine. i'll close this with the highest rated answer as i don't think we'll find out the performance problem, due to no one except me seeing the issue :(

*UPDATE 5, SOLUTION: based on the help from the 2 answers i got, i figured out the problem, see my answer below for more details (summary: the first call to System.nanoTime() takes a long time) *

Here are my sample apps:

//scala
object HelloWorld {
  //extends Application {
  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    println("hello scala")
    var total: Long = 0
    var i: Long = 0
    var x: Long=0;
    //warm up of the JVM to avoid timing of runtime initialization
    while (i < 100000)
    {
      x=i;
      x += x - 1;
      x -= x + 1;
      x += 1;
      x -= 1;
      total += x;
      i+=1;
    }
    //reset variables
    total = 0
    i = 0;
    //start timing
    var start: Long = System.nanoTime

    //run test
    while (i < 100000) {
      x=i;
      x += x - 1;
      x -= x + 1;
      x += 1;
      x -= 1;

      total += x;
      i+=1;
    }
    var end: Long = System.nanoTime
    System.out.println("ms, checksum = ")
    System.out.println((end - start) / 1000)
    System.out.println(total)
  }
}

and here is the java equivalent, 30x faster

//java
public class app {
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        String message = "hello, java";
        System.out.println(message);
        long total = 0;
        //warm up of the JVM to avoid timing of runtime initialization
        for(long i=0;i< 100000;i++)
        {
            long x=i;
            x+=x-1;
            x-=x+1;
            x++;
            x--;
            total+=x;
        }
        //reset variables
        total = 0;
        //start timing and run test
        long start = System.nanoTime();
        for(long i=0;i< 100000;i++)
        {
            long x=i;
            x+=x-1;
            x-=x+1;
            x++;
            x--;
            total+=x;
        }
        long end = System.nanoTime();
        System.out.println("ms, checksum = ");
        System.out.println((end-start)/1000);
        System.out.println(total);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
from the answers, perhaps there is a problem of how I am running the test. I am using IntelliJ 11.1 to run both tests. I can't figure out how to run the Scala app from the command line (i can run the java app fine), so that's why I'm running it in the IDE. can anyone tell me how to execute the Scala app via the java.exe (windows) jvm? Or maybe if there is a way to get better perf from the Scala test in IntelliJ, how do I do that? I'm a .NET developer so I am unfamiliar with how to do this benchmark properly. much help appreciated. –  JasonS Mar 21 '12 at 5:56
    
I get exactly the same times for both versions, running from IntelliJ 11.0 –  Luigi Plinge Mar 21 '12 at 6:07
    
.... then, if anyone has any ideas on what the issue is, I'd love to hear, because I get 208ms for java, and about 7000ms for scala :( –  JasonS Mar 21 '12 at 6:18
    
Are you using the same JVM version to run both? 64-bit / 32-bit and Java 7 vs 6 can make a big difference. –  Luigi Plinge Mar 21 '12 at 6:38
    
sorry Luigi, i'm not skilled enough to know how to determine if i have the 32bit runtime installed, or if either the java or scala version is using it. I installed the J2SE 6 SDK (64bit), which is what i use for development, so I'd assume that's what intellij is using for both. –  JasonS Mar 21 '12 at 6:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

so, i guess i figured out the answer myself.

the problem is in the call to System.nanoTime. doing this has some initialization cost (loading up the java base libraries, etc) which is much less expensive to load when called from the java runtime than from the scala runtime.

i prove this by changing the initial value of total, instead setting it to

var total: Long = System.nanoTime()

this is added before the first "warm up" loop, and doing so now makes both versions of the app (java and scala) run at the same time: about 2100 for 1000000 iterations.

thanks for your guy's help on this, i wouldn't have figured this out without your assistance.

ps: i'll leave the "accepted answer" as-is because i wouldn't have tracked this down without his help.

share|improve this answer

I've re-run your code (and increased number of cycles x1000, so to get some meaning into benchmark).

Results:

Scala: 92 ms
Java: 59 ms

You can see that Java is 30% faster.

Looking at the bytecode, I can say that two versions are almost identical - so the difference is really strange (the bytecode listing is quite long, so I won't post it here).

Increasing the count x10000 gives this:

Scala: 884 ms
Java: 588 ms

Since the results are fairly stable, there should be some constant factor lurking somewhere. Maybe in some parameters that "scala" runner passes to JVM?

EDIT:

My configuration:

$ java -version
java version "1.6.0_26"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_26-b03)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 20.1-b02, mixed mode)

$ scala -version
Scala code runner version 2.9.0.1 -- Copyright 2002-2011, LAMP/EPFL

$ inxi -SCD
System:    Host the-big-maker Kernel 2.6.35-22-generic x86_64 (64 bit) Distro Linux Mint 10 Julia
CPU:       Quad core AMD Phenom II X4 965 (-MCP-) cache 2048 KB flags (lm nx sse sse2 sse3 sse4a svm) 
           Clock Speeds: (1) 800.00 MHz (2) 800.00 MHz (3) 800.00 MHz (4) 800.00 MHz
Disks:     HDD Total Size: 750.2GB (5.8% used) 1: /dev/sda OCZ 90.0GB 
           2: /dev/sdb ST3500413AS 500.1GB 3: /dev/sdc ST3802110A 80.0GB 
           4: /dev/sdd Maxtor_6Y080M0 80.0GB 
share|improve this answer
    
definitely not as bad as I was seeing. a 2x perf difference is in the acceptable range. Your answer plus the next tells me I need to find a better way of executing Scala code to do proper benchmarks. –  JasonS Mar 21 '12 at 6:00
    
thanks for the extra info on bytecode, as that's really what I was concerned about. both you and n.m. gave prompt and good answers, but you were first! –  JasonS Mar 21 '12 at 6:09
2  
@jaysun - A bit of advice - the old one, about "premature optimization". Keep in mind, that Scala is best at writing correct, type-safe, and idiomatic code - not performant code (all those boxings and implicits ...). And if you really need to squeeze the best performance out of the code, you can go to java and even pure bytecode at any time (without any limitations - Scala has excellent interop with Java). –  Rogach Mar 21 '12 at 6:11
1  
@jaysun - scalac tries to unbox all those operations on primitives during compilation, so most of the time they compile to the same code :). About 30x - maybe something is wrong with your configuration? Versions of Scala and Java can be of interest, for example. –  Rogach Mar 21 '12 at 6:45
1  
@Rogach for me the bytecode is the same and the results are the same. Even if I up the iterations to 1e8. –  Matthew Farwell Mar 21 '12 at 7:36
$ javac app.java
$ scalac app.scala 
$ scala HelloWorld
hello scala
ms, checksum = 
1051
-100000
$ java app
hello, java
ms, checksum = 
1044
-100000

What I'm doing wrong?

share|improve this answer
    
probably me being ignorant then. i was trying to run in the IDE, not knowing how to run the scala app via the java.exe commandline. I'll try running it as you do via the scala runtime and see if that's better. –  JasonS Mar 21 '12 at 6:04

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