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Am using this javascript for restrict users to type only numbers and only one dot as decimal separator.

<script type="text/javascript">
 function fun_AllowOnlyAmountAndDot(txt)
        {
            if(event.keyCode > 47 && event.keyCode < 58 || event.keyCode == 46)
            {
               var txtbx=document.getElementById(txt);
               var amount = document.getElementById(txt).value;
               var present=0;
               var count=0;

               if(amount.indexOf(".",present)||amount.indexOf(".",present+1));
               {
              // alert('0');
               }

              /*if(amount.length==2)
              {
                if(event.keyCode != 46)
                return false;
              }*/
               do
               {
               present=amount.indexOf(".",present);
               if(present!=-1)
                {
                 count++;
                 present++;
                 }
               }
               while(present!=-1);
               if(present==-1 && amount.length==0 && event.keyCode == 46)
               {
                    event.keyCode=0;
                    //alert("Wrong position of decimal point not  allowed !!");
                    return false;
               }

               if(count>=1 && event.keyCode == 46)
               {

                    event.keyCode=0;
                    //alert("Only one decimal point is allowed !!");
                    return false;
               }
               if(count==1)
               {
                var lastdigits=amount.substring(amount.indexOf(".")+1,amount.length);
                if(lastdigits.length>=2)
                            {
                              //alert("Two decimal places only allowed");
                              event.keyCode=0;
                              return false;
                              }
               }
                    return true;
            }
            else
            {
                    event.keyCode=0;
                    //alert("Only Numbers with dot allowed !!");
                    return false;
            }

        }

    </script>

<td align="right">
<asp:TextBox ID="txtQ1gTarget" runat="server" Width="30px" CssClass="txtbx" MaxLength="6" onkeypress="return fun_AllowOnlyAmountAndDot(this);"></asp:TextBox>
</td>

But the onkeypress(this) event returns object required error in that function at this place

var amount = document.getElementById(txt).value;

What's my mistake here?

share|improve this question
    
Doesn't prevent copy and paste :( –  MobileMon Feb 26 at 16:06

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Instead of using this:

onkeypress="return fun_AllowOnlyAmountAndDot(this);"

You should use this:

onkeypress="return fun_AllowOnlyAmountAndDot(this.id);"

share|improve this answer
    
This one working. Thank you so much. –  itzArun Mar 21 '12 at 11:19

This is a great place to use regular expressions.

By using a regular expression, you can replace all that code with just one line.

You can use the following regex to validate your requirements:

[0-9]*\.?[0-9]*

In other words: zero or more numeric characters, followed by zero or one period(s), followed by zero or more numeric characters.

You can replace your code with this:

function validate(s) {
    var rgx = /^[0-9]*\.?[0-9]*$/;
    return s.matches(rgx);
}

That code can replace your entire function!

Note that you have to escape the period with a backslash (otherwise it stands for 'any character').

For more reading on using regular expressions with javascript, check this out:

You can also test the above regex here:


Explanation of the regex used above:

  • The brackets mean "any character inside these brackets." You can use a hyphen (like above) to indicate a range of chars.

  • The * means "zero or more of the previous expression."

  • [0-9]* means "zero or more numbers"

  • The backslash is used as an escape character for the period, because period usually stands for "any character."

  • The ? means "zero or one of the previous character."

  • The ^ represents the beginning of a string.

  • The $ represents the end of a string.

  • Starting the regex with ^ and ending it with $ ensures that the entire string adheres to the regex pattern.

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Let me try with regular expressions –  itzArun Mar 21 '12 at 11:20

Use Jquery instead. Add a decimal class to your textbox:

<input type="text" class="decimal" value="" />

Use this code in your JS. It checks for multiple decimals and also restrict users to type only numbers.

$('.decimal').keyup(function(){
    var val = $(this).val();
    if(isNaN(val)){
         val = val.replace(/[^0-9\.]/g,'');
         if(val.split('.').length>2) 
             val =val.replace(/\.+$/,"");
    }
    $(this).val(val); 
});​

Check this fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/2YW8g/

Hope it helps.

share|improve this answer

<script type="text/javascript">
    function numericValidation(txtvalue) {
        var e = event || evt; // for trans-browser compatibility
        var charCode = e.which || e.keyCode;
        if (!(document.getElementById(txtvalue.id).value))
         {
            if (charCode > 31 && (charCode < 48 || charCode > 57))
                return false;
            return true;
        }
        else {
               var val = document.getElementById(txtvalue.id).value;
            if(charCode==46 || (charCode > 31 && (charCode > 47 && charCode < 58)) )
             {
                var points = 0;            
                points = val.indexOf(".", points);                    
                if (points >= 1 && charCode == 46)
                {      
                   return false;
                }                 
                if (points == 1) 
                {
                    var lastdigits = val.substring(val.indexOf(".") + 1, val.length);
                    if (lastdigits.length >= 2)
                    {
                        alert("Two decimal places only allowed");
                        return false;
                    }
                }
                return true;
            }
            else {
                alert("Only Numarics allowed");
                return false;
            }
        }
    }

</script>
<form id="form1" runat="server">
<div>
  <asp:TextBox ID="txtHDLLevel" MaxLength="6" runat="server" Width="33px" onkeypress="return numericValidation(this);"  />
</div>
</form>

share|improve this answer
1  
Posting the solution is good, but it might improve your answer if you describe or highlight what the mistake was. –  Smamatti Oct 20 '12 at 12:34

This works best for me.

I also apply a currency formatter on blur where the decimal part is rounded at 2 digits just in case after validating with parseFloat.

The functions that get and set the cursor position are from Vishal Monpara's blog. I also do some nice stuff on focus with those functions. You can easily remove 2 blocks of code where 2 decimals are forced if you want and get rid of the set/get caret functions.

<html>
<body>
<input type="text" size="30" maxlength="30" onkeypress="return numericValidation(this,event);" />
<script language="JavaScript">
    function numericValidation(obj,evt) {
        var e = event || evt; // for trans-browser compatibility

        var charCode = e.which || e.keyCode;        

        if (charCode == 46) { //one dot
            if (obj.value.indexOf(".") > -1)
                return false;
            else {
                //---if the dot is positioned in the middle give the user a surprise, remember: just 2 decimals allowed
                var idx = doGetCaretPosition(obj);
                var part1 = obj.value.substr(0,idx),
                    part2 = obj.value.substring(idx);

                if (part2.length > 2) {
                    obj.value = part1 + "." + part2.substr(0,2);
                    setCaretPosition(obj, idx + 1);
                    return false;
                }//---

                //allow one dot if not cheating
                return true;
            }
        }
        else if (charCode > 31 && (charCode < 48 || charCode > 57)) { //just numbers
            return false;
        }

        //---just 2 decimals stubborn!
        var arr = obj.value.split(".") , pos = doGetCaretPosition(obj);

        if (arr.length == 2 && pos > arr[0].length && arr[1].length == 2)                               
            return false;
        //---

        //ok it's a number
        return true;
    }

    function doGetCaretPosition (ctrl) {
        var CaretPos = 0;   // IE Support
        if (document.selection) {
        ctrl.focus ();
            var Sel = document.selection.createRange ();
            Sel.moveStart ('character', -ctrl.value.length);
            CaretPos = Sel.text.length;
        }
        // Firefox support
        else if (ctrl.selectionStart || ctrl.selectionStart == '0')
            CaretPos = ctrl.selectionStart;
        return (CaretPos);
    }

    function setCaretPosition(ctrl, pos){
        if(ctrl.setSelectionRange)
        {
            ctrl.focus();
            ctrl.setSelectionRange(pos,pos);
        }
        else if (ctrl.createTextRange) {
            var range = ctrl.createTextRange();
            range.collapse(true);
            range.moveEnd('character', pos);
            range.moveStart('character', pos);
            range.select();
        }
    }
</script>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
function isNumber(evt) {
evt = (evt) ? evt : window.event;
var charCode = (evt.which) ? evt.which : evt.keyCode;
if (charCode > 31 && (charCode < 46 || charCode > 57)) {
return false;
}
return true;
}

you should use this function and write the properties of this element ;

< input id="deneme" data-mini="true" onKeyPress="return isNumber(event)" type="text"/>

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