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I'm learning Objective-C and trying to make a very simple command line calculator. 'S' should set the calculator to a specific value and 'E' should end the calculator.

My solution for this was to create a while-loop and let it run while the operator is not equal to 'E' or 'e'. Problem: if the operator is equal to 'E' or 'e', the while-loop is still executed (because it returns the message 'Please use a valid operator').

(I also tried it with an do-while statement but that didn't work either)

    while (operator != 'E' && operator != 'e')
    {
        NSLog (@"Type in a number and an operator.");
        scanf ("%lf %c", &number, &operator);

        if (operator == 'S' || operator == 's')
        {
            [deskCalc setResult: number];
        }

        else if ( operator == '+' )
        {
            [deskCalc add: number];
        }

        else if ( operator == '-' )
        {
            [deskCalc subtract: number];
        }

        else
        {
            NSLog(@"Please use a valid operator ( + or - )");
        }
    }

    if (operator == 'E' || operator == 'e')
    {
        [deskCalc showResult];
    }

Why are the while-statements still being executed if I use 'E' as an operator?

Thanks in advantage :)

share|improve this question
    
The most simple way in this case is likely to use break. –  user166390 Mar 21 '12 at 8:20
    
You should check the return code from scanf. It is possible that when you type something invalid number and operator don't get assigned to. –  Joni Mar 21 '12 at 8:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

operator isn't 'E' until you type it in - by that point, you are inside the loop, so the invalid operator message will be shown. You need to check again after your scanf and break out of the loop if the value is E or e.

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I've been looking at that code for more than an hour, and it turns out to be so simple! thanks so much for your fast and accurate reply! this system (Stack Overflow) is awesome :) –  mvanheusden Mar 21 '12 at 8:23

You should try [operator isEqual:@"E"] like

while (![operator isEqual:@'E'] && ![operator isEqual:@'e'])
{
    NSLog (@"Type in a number and an operator.");
    scanf ("%lf %c", &number, &operator);

    if ([operator isEqual:@'S'] || [operator isEqual:@'s'])
    {
        [deskCalc setResult: number];
    }

    else if ([operator isEqual:@'+'] )
    {
        [deskCalc add: number];
    }

    else if ( [operator isEqual:@'-'] )
    {
        [deskCalc subtract: number];
    }

    else
    {
        NSLog(@"Please use a valid operator ( + or - )");
    }
}

if ([operator isEqual:@'E'] || [operator isEqual:@'e'])
{
    [deskCalc showResult];
}

Hope this will help you out.

share|improve this answer
    
operator is a char, not an NSString - you can't send messages to it –  jrturton Mar 21 '12 at 8:26
    
maybe this will work as well (didn't learn about isEqual yet) but It's not necessary. I used @jrturton his solution and it works like a charm :) thanks for your input though! –  mvanheusden Mar 21 '12 at 8:30

Look at

  while (operator != 'E' && operator != 'e')

You mistaken with "&&", you should write

  while (operator != 'E' || operator != 'e')

Your operator can't be equal to "E" and "e" at same time.

PS you should use [operator isEqual:@'E'] like Zohaib showed

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but it can be NOT equal to e and E at the same time. –  jrturton Mar 21 '12 at 8:27
    
Your last sentence is right, but the rest of your answer is wrong. My operator CAN at the same time 'not be equal to E' and 'not be equal to e'. So it can both be unequal. –  mvanheusden Mar 21 '12 at 8:38

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