Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using NHibernate to bulk-insert rows into my database. Because of the amount of data I am inserting, I am using IStatelessSession instead of ISession. The objects I am inserting use assigned identities (ie no hilo or guids generated -- the unique ids are assigned to the objects).

My problem is that I have an object (say Foo) which has a many-to-one reference to another object (say Bar). I insert all of the Bar objects first and that is no problem.

The problem comes when I want to insert the Foo objects. I know the unique identifier of each Bar object, but I don't want to have to retrieve each Bar object from the database in order to set the property on the Foo object before inserting it.

Now might be a good time to show a simple example:

public class Foo {
    // Unique identifier (assigned)
    public virtual int Id { get; set; }

    // Many-to-one reference to a Bar object
    public virtual Bar Bar { get; set; }
}

public class Bar {
    // Unique identifier (assigned)
    public virtual int Id { get; set; }
}

Let's say that I want to create a new Foo object with an Id of (say) 1234 that references a Bar object that has an Id of (say) 4567. I know that there is already a Bar object with this identifier because I have added all the Bar objects previously.

How do I go about adding the Foo object without having to retrieve the Bar object from the database again?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Strange that sometimes if you take the time to formulate your question, you realise the answer shortly after.

What you do is create a dummy object that has the Id and nothing else set.

STEP 1: Insert the Bar Object

using (var session = SessionFactory.OpenStatelessSession())
{
    using (var tx = session.BeginTransaction())
    {
        var bar = new Bar
        {
            Id = 1234,
            // and populate all of the other
            // properties that you would put here
        };
        session.Insert(bar);
        tx.Commit();
    }
}

STEP 2: Insert the Foo Object with a dummy Bar object

using (var session = SessionFactory.OpenStatelessSession())
{
    using (var tx = session.BeginTransaction())
    {
        var foo = new Foo
        {
            Id = 4567,
            // dummy Bar object that has an Id and nothing else
            Bar = new Bar {Id = 1234}
        };
        session.Insert(foo);
        tx.Commit();
    }
}

But if anyone has a better way (for example, that does not require creating lots of dummy objects), I'd be grateful for advice.

share|improve this answer

Store the Bar objects in a Dictionary<int, Bar> after you insert them and assign the reference to the correct Bar object:

var foo = new Foo();
foo.Bar = bars[1234];
session.Save(foo); // there is no session.Insert method

You solution works too but requires a public setter for Bar.Id.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks Jamie. What you are suggesting here would work. It is providing the same functionality as the session cache of a stateful session (ISession). For a small number of objects this would work fine. For a large number of objects this can use up all available memory. –  John Jeffery Mar 21 '12 at 20:29
1  
Your comment about a public setter is a good one. What I do in my code is have a constructor that accepts an Id parameter. The Id property has a protected setter for NHibernate to use, and the class also has a protected, default constructor for NHibernate to use. This makes the Id property immutable, but it means I have to create lots of objects which seem to get garbage collected quickly enough. –  John Jeffery Mar 21 '12 at 20:32
    
If you're inserting enough data to worry about using up available memory then I would suggest an ETL solution instead of NHibernate. In fact, I would profile the app using an ISession and Load (flushing the ISession every 500 inserts or so) before going to IStatelessSession. –  Jamie Ide Mar 21 '12 at 21:40
    
Yes, ETL is probably a more conventional solution for this sort of thing. My application is loading approx 2 million entities. My reason for using NHibernate in this situation is that it makes it database agnostic (which is something I need for this application). Performance is reasonable using the solution outlined above, but it would be slower than using an ETL solution (such as bulk-copy in MS SQL Server) –  John Jeffery Mar 22 '12 at 1:38
1  
As for profiling using the stateful session, that would be fine as long as I have the referenced objects in my session cache. If I am clearing out every 500 or so inserts, then I will find that the objects I need to refer to are not in the session cache, and I need a database hit to bring them back in. With a statefull session you cannot use the solution outlined above of creating a dummy object with only the Id set -- you need to have a persistent object and that means getting it back from the database. –  John Jeffery Mar 22 '12 at 1:41

You can use session.Get(id), if the session has got Bar's entityies, it return a proxy, and you'll create Foo object by proxy reference without any call to the DataBase.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks Anton. See comment above. This applies only for stateful sessions, not stateless sessions. –  John Jeffery Mar 21 '12 at 20:26
    
Thank you for your reply, I'll know for the future –  Anton Mar 21 '12 at 20:31

This does NOT make a trip to the the database and is a way to populate the foreign-key without having to load the entity.

var foo = new Foo
{
  Id = 4567,
  Bar = new Session.Get<Bar>(1234)
};

Ignore.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks Rippo. You would be correct about this in the case of a normal, stateful session (ISession) where the object with id 1234 is in the session cache. I am talking about a stateless session (IStatelessSession), which does not have a session cache. In this case the Get method will always go to the database. The stateful session has a Load method which does not go to the database because it creates a proxy, but the stateless session does not have this method. –  John Jeffery Mar 21 '12 at 20:24
    
Ah I see sorry, however LOAD does not require the entity to be in level one cache (I think, I will test this) but you are right about the IStatelessSession –  Rippo Mar 22 '12 at 6:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.