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I'm trying to assign a function for each element in a loop. I would like the functions use the value of the variable, but they use the last value of the variable:

assign.instrumentslist = function()
{
  for(instList in lists.instruments)
  {
  assign(
      paste("test", instList, sep="."),
      function() {print(instList)},
      envir = .GlobalEnv
      )
   }
}

lists.instruments = c("CL", "HO", "GC")
assign.instrumentslist()
test.CL()
# return "GC"

thx

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Probably this is the easiest way:

assign.instrumentslist = function() {
  for(instList in lists.instruments) {
    local({
      i <- instList
      assign(
             paste("test", instList, sep="."),
             function() {print(i)},
             pos = .GlobalEnv
             )
    })
  }
}

The key is to create local objects (i) on the function's enclosing environment. In this example, the environment is generated by local.

And this is a really really bad hack:

lapply(lists.instruments, 
  function(x) .GlobalEnv[[paste("test1", x, sep=".")]] <- function() print(x))
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1  
+1 because it works, but you should be punished for putting it up here! ;-) –  Joris Meys Mar 21 '12 at 9:10
    
Please keep it to yourself ;-p –  kohske Mar 21 '12 at 9:13
    
Thx for your help! Olivier –  user1281273 Mar 21 '12 at 9:46

I can explain the behaviour but am not sure what the correct way to solve it is (environments make my head hurt).

The problem is that your anonymous function picks up an environment. it is the environment in which it will look for objects, including instList. At the first iteration, it gets this environment <environment: 0x28e19a8> and this is the current environment for your function that is being evaluated (assign.instrumentslist()):

Browse[2]> environment()
<environment: 0x28e19a8>

At the next iteration of the loop the value of instList in the current environment <environment: 0x28e19a8> gets changed to "HO". Now both test.CL() and test.HO() have the same environment so refer to the same instList, which now has value "HO". The same thing happens in the final iteration for test.GC(). The following debugging transcript shows this:

debug at #5: assign(paste("test", instList, sep = "."), function() {
    print(instList)
}, envir = .GlobalEnv)
Browse[2]> 
debug at #3: instList
Browse[2]> environment(test.CL)
<environment: 0x28e19a8>
Browse[2]> eval(instList, environment(test.CL))
[1] "CL"
Browse[2]> 
debug at #5: assign(paste("test", instList, sep = "."), function() {
    print(instList)
}, envir = .GlobalEnv)
Browse[2]> 
debug at #3: instList
Browse[2]> environment(test.CL)
<environment: 0x28e19a8>
Browse[2]> eval(instList, environment(test.CL))
[1] "HO"

When the loop is finished, the evaluation environment of the assign.instrumentslist(), <environment: 0x28e19a8>, persists because it is also the environment of your three functions. They all refer to the same environment and use the value of instList that was set during the last iteration of your loop.

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What's wrong with using arguments?

AsItShouldBeDone <- 
function(x){
    print(x)
}

> AsItShouldBeDone('CL')
[1] "CL"

That's about as much typing work: giving the CL as argument instead of an extra addition to the name of the function. And that's how you should do it.

What is wrong with your solution? :

  • the use of assign(): it's very unwise to change your global environment from within a function in any language, and definitely completely against the R way of thinking. So don't. I happened to have a dataframe called test.CL in my workspace. Well, that's gone now...
  • creating different functions with different names and all with the same code. Why is that? If you're trying to find a shortcut to assign S3 methods for different classes, try the following. In any other case, use arguments to make your function do what it should

    test.CL <- test.HO <- test.GC <- function(x) print(x)

  • expecting that the value of a variable is hardcoded in a function from within a loop. No, it's not. R tells you this is the function :

    > test.CL

    function() {print(instList)}

    <environment: 0x05e32224>

So what it does is quite obvious: it prints instList from the environment given in environment. Which is the environment created by your first function. Which contains the value of instList after the looping. Which is the last value.

That mechanism is hacked by the method of Koshke. It works. It's not because it works that you should use it, in contrary; hacking environments like this can have very funny side effects and is in no way stable code. Plus, as said before:

USE ARGUMENTS FOR CHRIST'S SAKE!

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I must humbly disagree, not with the explanation of what is happening - that is spot on - but with the other point. I have seen plenty of use cases for what the OP is trying to do. He wants a function that can be defined to return something specific, not be passed in. I've seen this idiom used quite a bit but can't recall actual examples now. He's just going about it the wrong way because of the environment issue. –  Gavin Simpson Mar 21 '12 at 9:15
    
@GavinSimpson : But if you create three functions, where you specify in the name what you want returned, how is that better than writing one function where you specify in the arguments what you want returned? The only use case I can see is for quickly creating getters and setters for every slot in an S4 class without having to type them all out, but even then I consider that bad coding practice. Plus, technically the value inside those arguments can be changed, which makes your function return something else suddenly. It's not stable code. –  Joris Meys Mar 21 '12 at 9:23
    
I'm not saying I would do what the OP is doing, and I hope/doubt that the example shown is the real use case (just a reproducible example to illustrate the issue), but the above can be and is done by lots of people, many of them cleverer than I who implement it properly. –  Gavin Simpson Mar 21 '12 at 9:30
1  
@Gavin, the only risk to doing "cleverer" things is that Muphry's Law is just waiting to attack people who do them. –  Carl Witthoft Mar 21 '12 at 12:40

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