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I'm playing around with MVVM, getting to know the stuff involved in the pattern. The first application I'm writing is a very small application which basically displays 2 settings from the App.Config.

My goal is to be able to write to this app.config when the button is clicked.

My problem lies in the fact I don't know exactly how to wire up a command to delegate this work to, or if this is even the way to go.

My App.config is very straight forward:

 <configuration>
  <appSettings>
    <add key="duration" value="100" />
    <add key="operators" value="10" />
  </appSettings>
</configuration>

The model looks like:

    get
    {
        // try to parse the setting from the configuration file
        // if it fails return the default setting 0
        int durationSetting = 0;                
        Int32.TryParse(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["duration"], out durationSetting);

        return durationSetting;
    }
    set
    {                
        var config = ConfigurationManager.OpenExeConfiguration(ConfigurationUserLevel.None);
        config.AppSettings.Settings.Remove("duration");
        config.AppSettings.Settings.Add("duration", Convert.ToString(value));
        ConfigurationManager.RefreshSection("appSettings");
        config.Save();       
    }
}

So, the model is responsible for the actual data access, this is what we want, right?

Furthermore I have a ViewModel (ViewModelBase implements INotifyPropertyChanged):

public class SettingsViewModel : ViewModelBase 
{
    private Settings Settings { get; set; }

    private SaveCommand saveCommand = new SaveCommand();

    public ICommand SaveCommand
    {
        get
        {
            return saveCommand;
        }
    }

    public SettingsViewModel(Settings settings)
    {
        if (settings == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("Settings", "Settings cannot be null");
        Settings = settings;
    }

    public int Duration
    {
        get { return Settings.Duration; }
        set
        {
            if (Settings.Duration != value)
            {
                Settings.Duration = value;
                RaisePropertyChanged("Duration");
            }
        }
    }

The view is a xaml usercontrol, instantiated like this:

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    public SettingsViewModel SettingsViewModel { get; set; }

    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        DataContext = this;

        Settings settings = new Settings();

        SettingsViewModel = new SettingsViewModel(settings);
    }
}

Lastly there's a SaveCommand which implements ICommand, which is basically empty at this point. I've hooked up the command to a button in the view.

But basically, now what? What's the best way to handle the saving of the values? Is the example I'm working on too contrived?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would recommend using the very useful MVVM Light toolkit.

Basically, you will expose a ICommand public property that returns an instance of a RelayCommand:

private RelayCommand myCommand;

public ICommand MyCommand
{
    get
    {
        return this.myCommand;
    }
}

...

// in constructor of the view model:
this.myCommand = new RelayCommand(this.MyCommandImplementation);

...

private void MyCommandImplementation()
{
    // Save your parameters here from your model
}

Something strange in your code is that you actually already save your settings in the setter of the public property named Duration. What you could do instead (to prevent from saving each time the property is modified) is to simply use a private variable in your ViewModel:

private int duration;
public int Duration
{
    get { return this.duration; }
    set
    {
        if (this.duration != value)
        {
            this.duration = value;
            RaisePropertyChanged("Duration");
        }
    }
}

So when you modify a UI field binded to your Duration property, you only update the private duration field. Thus you'll only save it to the app.config file in the MyCommandImplementation method.

private void MyCommandImplementation()
{
    this.Settings.Duration = this.Duration;
}

Also note that your Settings management is a bit complicated (you remove then add again a settings, why?). Last thing: in your view, you're currently using the view itself as datacontext. You have to specify your ViewModel instead:

this.SettingsViewModel = new SettingsViewModel(settings);
this.DataContext = this.SettingsViewModel;

Also, I don't think it's the role of your view to instantiate your model. I would instantiate Settings from the ViewModel instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, because of the saving behavior i was wondering if the command, in this case, was unnecessary cq my example being too contrived. The settings are done like this, because there doesn't seem to be an edit methods. – fuaaark Mar 21 '12 at 10:01
    
@fuaaark Well, it's up to you to choose what you actually want. If your goal is "to be able to write to this app.config when the button is clicked", then you'll need a button and a ICommand. If you don't need a button, then simply save to the app.config file in the property setter and you won't need ICommand. – ken2k Mar 21 '12 at 10:10
    
I'm going to implement it using the command, to learn stuff :) But I shoulde probably factor in some SaveSettings() method and call that from the command, so as not to polute the command with data access logic. Is that right? – fuaaark Mar 21 '12 at 10:14
    
@fuaaark In the code above, as you can see there is only a private field and a public property that exposes the command. All the logic is implemented in the MyCommandImplementation method. It's totally fine to write all your save logic in this method. Calling a SaveSettings() method from MyCommandImplementation() is not really helpful, you can write your logic directly in MyCommandImplementation. – ken2k Mar 21 '12 at 10:21

All you need to do is to implement ICommand interface in a class and set SaveCommand property to an instance of this class. You can either you some third party command classes, like DelegateCommand of prism library or RelayCommand. Refer to the following web page for a sample implementation of ICommand; http://weblogs.asp.net/fredriknormen/archive/2010/01/03/silverlight-4-make-commanding-use-lesser-code.aspx

then the actions to be employed shall be registered in the command;

this.SaveCommand= new SaveCommand((o) =>
        {
            //change the model
        });
share|improve this answer
    
I have, in a class called "SaveCommand", as the description of my problem states. – fuaaark Mar 21 '12 at 9:33

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