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I am using mysql with php Yii framework.When doing data modelling I came accross some doubt.I have a table for user details like this.

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `tbl_users` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `firstname` varchar(80) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
  `lastname` varchar(80) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
  `gender` varchar(6) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
  `email` varchar(45) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
  `company_name` varchar(80) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
  `contact_no` varchar(45) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
  `address` varchar(120) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
  `state` varchar(45) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
  `country` varchar(45) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
  `created_by` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  `updated_by` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  `created_at` datetime DEFAULT NULL,
  `updated_at` datetime DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 AUTO_INCREMENT=98 ;

Here my problem is I want the state,country should be like this so that I can use the fields like state/city

 `state/city` varchar(45) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
  `state/province` varchar(45) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',

So is it safe to use like this or I have to use only one option there?Any help and suggestions will be highly appriciable.

share|improve this question
    
Are you asking "is it valid to have / in a field name?"? –  Oli Charlesworth Mar 21 '12 at 9:30
    
yes...Is it valid?? –  NewUser Mar 21 '12 at 9:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, it's valid. But you will always need to quote it with backticks.

See http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/identifiers.html for full details on what's allowed.

share|improve this answer
    
in this link it is written as Database and table names cannot contain “/”, “\”, “.”, or characters that are not permitted in file names.So how to write city/town in the database –  NewUser Mar 21 '12 at 9:58
    
@newuser: That was in the old link (for version 4.1). But either way, you're talking about column names, not table names. –  Oli Charlesworth Mar 21 '12 at 10:03
    
ok..thanks a lot –  NewUser Mar 21 '12 at 10:08

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