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Input file text.txt:

foo()
{
}

buz()
{
}

Awk script.awk:

BEGIN {
    RS = "\n\n+";
    FS = "\n";
}
/[a-z]+\(\)\n/ {print "FUNCTION: " $1;}
{print "NOT FOUND: " $0;}

Running script:

awk -f script.awk text.txt

gives:

NOT FOUND: foo()
{
}
NOT FOUND: buz()
{
}

But I've expected to match both functions WITH newlines. How to do this?

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What version of awk are you using? –  glenn jackman Mar 21 '12 at 13:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can try this:

BEGIN {
    RS = "";
    FS = "\n";
}
/[a-z]+\(\)/ {print "FUNCTION: " $1;}
!/[a-z]+\(\)/ {print "NOT FOUND: " $0;}

If you want to verify that there is nothing after the () you can do this:

$1~/[a-z]+()$/ {print "FUNCTION: " $1;}

I don't know why newline isn't matched. Maybe someone would explain it.

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I've read than RS = "" and RS = "\n\n+" are the same, but they are not as you've mentioned above. But why.. –  egor7 Mar 22 '12 at 9:42

Since you're already using "\n" as the FS, you can just do matching against $1:

awk -v RS='\n\n+' -v FS='\n' '
  $1 ~ /^[a-z]+\(\)$/ {print "FUNCTION: " $1; next}
  {print "NOT FOUND: " $0}
' text.txt

This worked with gawk:

FUNCTION: foo()
FUNCTION: buz()
share|improve this answer
    
I need to match the expressions with new line \n. In your example there is no \n at the end of regexp. –  egor7 Mar 21 '12 at 14:24
1  
You're using newline as your field separator. Why don't you want to take advantage of that? –  glenn jackman Mar 21 '12 at 15:08

This might work for you (GNU awk):

awk '{if(/^[a-z]+\(\)\n/)print "FUNCTION:"$1; else print "NOT FOUND: "$0}' RS="" file
share|improve this answer
    
I need to match the expressions with new line \n. In your example there is no \n at the end of regexp. –  egor7 Mar 21 '12 at 14:25
    
Oops! forgot the newline! Solution amended. –  potong Mar 21 '12 at 14:31

Not sure what output you expect excactly.

In order to process FS in awk you need to indroduce a dummy command like $1=$1. Without it no filed parsing is done.

So if you expect result like this:

foo() { }
buz() { } 

Just type:

awk  '{$1=$1; print} '  RS='\n\n' FS='\n' OFS=" "
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