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The MSDN claims that the order is :

  1. Child table: delete records.
  2. Parent table: insert, update, and delete records.
  3. Child table: insert and update records.

I have a problem with that.

Example : ParentTable have two records parent1(Id : 1) and parent2(Id : 2)

ChildTable have a record child1(Id : 1, ParentId : 1)

If we update the child1 to have a new parent parent2, and then we delete parent1.

  1. We have nothing to delete in child table
  2. We delete parent1 : we broke the constraint, because the child is still attached to parent1, unless we update it first.

So what is the right order, and is the MSDN false on the subject?

My personnals thoughts is

  1. Child table: delete records.
  2. Parent table: insert, update records.
  3. Child table: insert and update records.
  4. Parent table: delete records.

But the problem is, with potentially unique constraint, we must always delete the records in a table before adding new... So I have no solution right now for commiting my datas to my database.

Edit : thanks for the answers, but your corner case is my daily case... I opt for the ugly solution to disabled constraint, then update database, and re-enabled constraint. I'm still searching a better solution..

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is this ms sql server? Or did I missed the tag. interesting question +1 –  cctan Mar 21 '12 at 9:54
    
It is SqlServer 2008, but I think it is pretty DBMS independant! –  Cyril Gandon Mar 21 '12 at 10:01
    
I think children changing their parents is an unusual circumstance. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Mar 21 '12 at 10:25
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6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+100

Doesn't your SQL product support deferred constraint checking ?

If not, you could try

Delete all child records - delete all parent records - insert all parent records - insert all child records

where any UPDATEs have been split into their constituent DELETEs and INSERTs.

This should work correctly in all cases, but at acceptable speeds probably in none ...

It is also provable that this is the only scheme that can work correctly in all cases, since :

(a) key constraints on parent dictate that parent DELETES must precede parent INSERTS,
(b) key constraints on child dictate that child DELETES must precede child INSERTS,
(c) FK dictates that child DELETES must precede parent DELETES
(d) FK also dictates that child INSERTS must follow parent INSERTS

The given sequence is the only possible one that satisfies these 4 requirements, and it also shows that UPDATEs to the child make a solution impossible no matter what, since an UPDATE means a "simultaneous" DELETE plus INSERT.

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Very interesting point, I never see an update as an insert + an update, but know I understand why I am in a dead end. For performance, I prefer to disabled constraint, but I keep your idea of splitting update in two. –  Cyril Gandon Mar 28 '12 at 7:11
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You have to take their context into account. MS said

When updating related tables in a dataset, it is important to update in the proper sequence to reduce the chance of violating referential integrity constraints.

in the context of writing client data application software.

Why is it important to reduce the chance of violating referential integrity constraints? Because violating those constraints means

  • more round trips between the dbms and the client, either for the client code to handle the constraint violations, or for the human user to handle the violations,
  • more time taken,
  • more load on the server,
  • more opportunities for human error, and
  • more chances for concurrent updates to change the underlying data (possibly confusing either the application code, the human user, or both).

And why do they consider their procedure the right way? Because it provides a single process that will avoid referential integrity violations in almost all the common cases, and even in a lot of the uncommon ones. For example . . .

  • If the update is a DELETE operation on the referenced table, and if foreign keys in the referencing tables are declared as ON DELETE CASCADE, then the optimal thing is to simply delete the referenced row (the parent row), and let the dbms manage the cascade. (This is also the optimal thing for ON DELETE SET DEFAULT, and for ON DELETE SET NULL.)

  • If the update is a DELETE operation on the referenced table, and if foreign keys in the referencing tables are declared as ON DELETE RESTRICT, then the optimal thing is to delete all the referencing rows (child rows) first, then delete the referenced row.

But, with proper use of transactions, MS's procedure leaves the database in a consistent state regardless. The value is that it's a single, client-side process to code and to maintain, even though it's not optimal in all cases. (That's often the case in software design--choosing a single way that's not optimal in all cases. ActiveRecord leaps to mind.)

You said

Example : ParentTable have two records parent1(Id : 1) and parent2(Id : 2)

ChildTable have a record child1(Id : 1, ParentId : 1)

If we update the child1 to have a new parent parent2, and the we delete parent1.

  1. We have nothing to delete in child table
  2. We delete parent1 : we broke the constraint, because the child is still attached to parent1, unless we update it first.

That's not a referential integrity issue; it's a procedural issue. This problem clearly requires two transactions.

  1. Update the child to have a new parent, then commit. This data must be corrected regardless of what happens to the first parent. Specifically, this data must be corrected even if there are concurrent updates or other constraints that make it either temporarily or permanently impossible to delete the first parent. (This isn't a referential integrity issue, because there's no ON DELETE SET TO NEXT PARENT ID OR MAKE YOUR BEST GUESS clause in SQL foreign key constraints.)

  2. Delete the first parent, then commit. This might require first updating any number of child rows in any number of tables. In a huge organization, I can imagine some deletes like this taking weeks to finish.

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wish I could give this more than one upvote! –  user158017 Mar 24 '12 at 14:19
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Sounds to me like:

  1. Insert parent2. Child still points to parent1.
  2. Update child to point to parent2. Now nothing references parent1.
  3. Delete parent1.

You'd want to wrap it in a transaction where available.

Depending on your schema, you could also extend this to:

  1. Update parent1 to indicate that it is locked (or lock it in the DB), thus preventing updates.
  2. Insert parent2
  3. Update child to point to parent2
  4. Delete parent1

This order has the advantage that a join between the parent and child will return a consistent result throughout. When the child is updating the results of a join will "flip" to the new state.

EDIT:

Another option is to move the parent/child references into another table, e.g. "links";

CREATE TABLE links (
    link_id INT NOT NULL IDENTITY(1,1) PRIMARY KEY,
    parent_id INT NOT NULL,
    child_id INT NOT NULL
);

You may well want foreign keys constraints on the parent and child columns, as of course some appropriate indices. This arrangement allows for very flexible relationships between the parent and child tables - possibly too flexible, but that depends on your application. Now you can do something like;

UPDATE links
    SET parent_id = @new_parent_id
    WHERE parent_id = @old_parent_id
    AND child_id = @child_id;
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The need to DELETE a parent record without deleting the child records is unusual enough that I am certain the normally prescribed order of dataset operations defined by MS does not apply in this case.

The most efficient method would be to UPDATE the child records to reflect the new parent, then DELETE the original parent. As others have mentioned, this operation should be performed within a transaction.

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I think seperating actions on tables is not a good design, so my solution is

  1. insert/update/delete parent table
  2. insert/update/delete child table

the key point is you should not change parentId of a child record, you should delete child of parent1 and add a new child to parent2. by doing like this you will no longer worry about broke constraint. and off course you must use transaction.

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Imagine a user table, pointing on a country table. I can't delete the user row each time the user want to change his country... (Don't answer me that I won't delete country, this is not the point :)) –  Cyril Gandon Mar 21 '12 at 11:09
    
I think you don't need to update country table when changing users country. so you don't need to delete user :). this case only happens on master child tables for me, not lookup tables. –  Özgür Kara Mar 21 '12 at 11:24
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MSDN claim is correct in the basis of using dependencies (foreign keys). Think of the order as

  1. Child table (cascade delete)
  2. Parent table: insert and/or update and/or delete record meaning final step of the cascade delete.
  3. Child table: insert or update.

Since we talk about cascade delete, we must guarantee that by deleting a parent record, there is a need to delete any child record relating to parent before we delete the parent record. If we don't have child records, there is no delete at child level. That's all.

On the other hand you may approach you case in different ways. I think that a real life (almost) scenario will be more helpful. Let's assume that the parent table is the master part of orders (orderID, clientID, etc) and the child table is the details part (detailID, orderID, productOrServiceID, etc). So you get an order and you have the following

Parent table

orderID = 1 (auto increment)
...

Child table

detailID = 1 (auto increment)
orderID = 1
productOrServiceID = 342

and

detailID = 2
orderID = 1
productOrServiceID = 169

and

detailID = 3
orderID = 1
productOrServiceID = 307

So we have one order for three products/services. Now your client wants you to move the second product or service to a new order and deliver it later. You have two options to do this.

The first one (direct)

  • Create a new order (new parent record) that gets orderID = 2

  • Update child table by setting orderID = 2 where orderID = 1 and productOrServiceID = 169

As a result you will have

Parent table

orderID = 1 (auto increment)
...

and

orderID = 2
...

Child table

detailID = 1 (auto increment)
orderID = 1
productOrServiceID = 342

and

detailID = 2
orderID = 2
productOrServiceID = 169

and

detailID = 3
orderID = 1
productOrServiceID = 307

The second one (indirect)

  • Keep a DataRow of the second product/service from child table as a variable

  • Delete the relative row from child table

  • Create a new order (new parent record) that gets orderID = 2

  • Insert the kept DataRow on child table by changing the field orderID from 1 to 2

As a result you will have

Parent table

orderID = 1 (auto increment)
...

and

orderID = 2
...

Child table

detailID = 1 (auto increment)
orderID = 1
productOrServiceID = 342

and

detailID = 3
orderID = 1
productOrServiceID = 307

and

detailID = 4
orderID = 2
productOrServiceID = 169

The reason for the second option, which is by the way the preferable one for many applications, is that gives raw sequences of detail ids for each parent record. I have seen cases of expanding the second option by recreating all details records. I think that is quite easy to find open source solutions relating to this case and check the implementation.

Finally my personal advice is to avoid doing this kind of stuff with datasets unless your application is single user. Databases can easily handle this "problem" in a thread safe way with transactions.

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